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Great Geddy Interview


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#1 chemistry1973

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 02:52 PM

This is good - they talk about writing, the early days, Peart, basses. Geddy seems very tired but his condition seems to bring out a different side of him- more sardonic and little grumpy. Makes for a great talk:

https://itunes.apple...d814550071?mt=2

#2 chemistry1973

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 06:52 PM

I finished listening to it this morning - inspiring. The guy still has the fire.



#3 Slim

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 10:46 PM

Was just watching this one a few minutes ago.

 



#4 SpaceGhost2112

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 10:50 PM

Watched that last night.  That's a good one!



#5 TimC

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 04:56 PM

Was just watching this one a few minutes ago.

 

Fascinating for sure. Was shocked to find out Wyman was so important to Geddy; I've never heard that mentioned. One bit I find amusing is how he's mentioned as non-busy, yet I think some of his least-successful stuff is when he tries to get busier (like on Some Girls), and some of his best stuff (IMO)...is actually played by Richards.

 

Also, getting into the weedy details here, the bit about fretted vs fretless is kind of an eye-roller - if the intended audience doesn't know, perhaps a couple examples (e.g. Jaco) actually played would be useful. I'd expect lots of the general public doesn't know a fretless is a bass when they hear it in a song, and his little oral demonstration doesn't convey much unless you already know.



#6 Slim

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 08:24 PM

Probably the best-known example of fretless bass in the UK is Pino Palladino's performance in Paul Young's version of Wherever I Lay My Hat

 

 

Keef does play bass on a couple of Stones tunes - Ronnie Wood has as well a few times, even before Bill left - but then he was the bass player in Jeff Beck's band.

 

Never thought Bill was much good myself, I must say.



#7 chemistry1973

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 08:36 PM

His Daryl Hall cover - Everytime You Go Away was Young’s biggest hit in the states - and also features memorable fretless playing by Paladino.

#8 fenderjazz

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Posted 23 December 2018 - 10:15 PM

Wyman has his moments but they were very limited. In the “Mick era” of songwriting in the early 80s he showed some versatility. On pivotal Keith songs very often Keith or Ron played bass.

#9 fenderjazz

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Posted 23 December 2018 - 10:16 PM

His Daryl Hall cover - Everytime You Go Away was Young’s biggest hit in the states - and also features memorable fretless playing by Paladino.


Forgot about that. Yes very fretless sounding. I often wondered if it were synth bass. I guess now we know.

#10 chemistry1973

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Posted 23 December 2018 - 10:41 PM

Listening to it now - it might be stick.

#11 baldiepete

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Posted 24 December 2018 - 05:10 PM

These days Rush get respectful interviews from the mainstream broadsheet press in the UK. :o

https://www.theguard...-greatest-songs

It’s a good interview and I especially like this quote.

So, Geddy Lee, have you ever been able to make sense of any concept albums? “Not really.” Not even your own? “Barely. I grew up listening to Yes. I still can’t tell you what any of those records are about, honestly. I don’t think it matters, because the music and the lyrics create a sound, and that gives you a picture of a meaning. Sometimes that’s enough to make you love it.






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