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New Geddy Interview


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#1 chemistry1973

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 03:51 PM

It’s pretty good - throws a wee bit of shade at Terry Brown.

https://www.rollings...res-738828/amp/

#2 fenderjazz

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 06:37 PM

I imagine there's a lot more to come promoting his book and the Hemispheres re-release.



#3 chemistry1973

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 07:19 PM

I think he's being a bit coy - he doesn't want to highlight a reunion when he's promoting the book.

 

He's got something happening - I'm certain.

 

He also teases a sort of Rush reunion but not under the Rush banner - which I think could be kind of brilliant.

 

What if Geddy, Alex and Peart changed the band name, wrote new music and played some club dates - just did something Non-rush but as 'Peart Lifeson Lee' or something. Maybe bring some extra players and singers along? Take away the pressure of playing these high production value gigs - as Rush - and just tour as a combo and play songs, on a totally stripped down level. Loose and fun.



#4 fenderjazz

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 07:43 PM

I think he's being a bit coy - he doesn't want to highlight a reunion when he's promoting the book.

 

He's got something happening - I'm certain.

 

He also teases a sort of Rush reunion but not under the Rush banner - which I think could be kind of brilliant.

 

What if Geddy, Alex and Peart changed the band name, wrote new music and played some club dates - just did something Non-rush but as 'Peart Lifeson Lee' or something. Maybe bring some extra players and singers along? Take away the pressure of playing these high production value gigs - as Rush - and just tour as a combo and play songs, on a totally stripped down level. Loose and fun.

 

Something like that could work.  Kind of like when Page/Plant did the albums and some shows together.  It wasn't really Zeppelin, they did new versions of some old songs and played each others solo songs too.



#5 grep

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 09:43 PM

Yeah, that would definitely work.

falconext.png


#6 AnalogKid

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 10:21 PM

e also teases a sort of Rush reunion but not under the Rush banner - which I think could be kind of brilliant.

I picked up on that as well. He was clear that we will never see Rush as Geddy, Alex, and Neil - that chapter is over, we went out on top, time to move on. But also hinted that we might see something involving two or all three of them, so they have clearly been talking about what to do next. Alex loves working with other bands, but he and Geddy are life-long friends and musical partners - it's just a matter of whether Neil wants to be involved, even if he doesn't play live. Neil has such high standards that he won't go into a project unless he's truly confident in his abilities, which means, at his age, spending substantial time getting his chops back and less time with his family. Or, maybe he'll just play a tamborine! 



#7 grep

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Posted 23 October 2018 - 03:40 AM

Pratt riding a BMW Bike on stage. The Progressive god!

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#8 Three Eyes

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 09:08 AM

Disappointed in Geddy here. His remarks very nearly throw Terry under the bus. From his own description, Terry was obviously hugely important in the arrangement of their songs while subsequent paycheck producers it appears allowed them rope enough to hang themselves on many occasions. You can tell this by the less judicious way many of their post-Signals songs are put together and this started as early as GUP. Maybe someone needs to remind Geddy it's the Terry albums that are celebrated the most.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#9 jeffro

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 10:44 AM

Makes you wonder how an album like VT or S&A could have come out had Broon been the producer. Too bad they never rounded back to him to do one last album.


Pure fat, topped with a layer of fat - Alex Lifeson
 
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#10 ClassicB

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 05:32 PM

Yup, nothing will beat the Terry albums. Terry was the one who didn't want Neil to add the electronic drums to his kit. Prime RUSH 1977 to 1983.



#11 fenderjazz

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 05:38 PM

Yup, nothing will beat the Terry albums. Terry was the one who didn't want Neil to add the electronic drums to his kit. Prime RUSH 1977 to 1983.

 

I think once Phil Collins did, that sealed it for Neil.  In 1981, "In the Air Tonight" came out with electronic drums and when the real drums hit, baboom!

 

 

I really think they just didn't want someone to always agree with them, but on the other hand, wanted someone who could take them into the world of electronica just a bit more than Terry was willing to.  Most of the producers they wanted to work with, or did work with after then had already dabbled in that field.



#12 Three Eyes

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 10:50 PM

I really think they just didn't want someone to always agree with them

 

I think the opposite is true. I think Terry, as the "mentor" and  "father figure", probably challenged them more often than subsequent producers who likely indulged their every whim and/or didn't have the ear, the editing power or the understanding of what Rush's music needed to be truly effective regardless the musical style they were working in. The guys probably just wanted to leave the nest to see if they could fly on their own.
 
But I wish they would have stuck it out with Terry AND still used the electronic drums (because I think the electronic drums were just a minor, transient issue to begin with even if they didn't see it that way at the time) just to see what would have happened. I'll bet many of the arrangements would have been more dynamic, less blocky, sections would not run on needlessly, beeps and boops wouldn't have been as randomly tossed in, the sound wouldn't have been quite as dehumanizingly glossy or layered, Alex would have been featured more, and on and on. I think the albums would have been more cohesive and interesting overall. And I think all this would have happened even with the big 80s, new wave change in direction they were forging at the time.
 
How many more masterpieces did we miss out on due to their split? I conceptualize a Terry Brown New Rush as kind of what we got with Clockwork Angels but with better sound. That album was as close to a return to form as Rush ever got post-Broon. Of course, you need to adjust for specific era but that would have been the quality, probably better, I'd expect from that team had they stayed together.

Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#13 TimC

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 05:17 PM

Disappointed in Geddy here. His remarks very nearly throw Terry under the bus. From his own description, Terry was obviously hugely important in the arrangement of their songs while subsequent paycheck producers it appears allowed them rope enough to hang themselves on many occasions. You can tell this by the less judicious way many of their post-Signals songs are put together and this started as early as GUP. Maybe someone needs to remind Geddy it's the Terry albums that are celebrated the most.

 

Fully agree, and - despite Signals being where they "knew" Terry had to go - I'd say Signals emphatically included. In fact, the fact that Rush felt Terry was doing the wrong stuff with Signals probably just shows how hard it is to be objective around your own material, something they've constantly commented on including here IIRC (I'm not rereading it, sorry).

 

Hell, FFS - Signals was ONE album after MP yet they were convinced the situation was stale and clearly going in the totally wrong direction, irretrievably?



#14 Saint Ronnie

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 07:21 PM

It's a tricky thing innit? Clearly the best albums have Broon involvement yet Rush should be the boss creatively. Too bad they didn't come back around to Terry. Presto would have been a good time to do that. The eighties keyboard domination experiment was taken as far as they could and now it was time to rock out again. Presto and RTB would have been much better with Terry's input. But none of us were there. Sometimes you can never go back.


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#15 chemistry1973

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 09:41 PM


I think the opposite is true. I think Terry, as the "mentor" and "father figure", probably challenged them more often than subsequent producers who likely indulged their every whim and/or didn't have the ear, the editing power or the understanding of what Rush's music needed to be truly effective regardless the musical style they were working in. The guys probably just wanted to leave the nest to see if they could fly on their own.

But I wish they would have stuck it out with Terry AND still used the electronic drums (because I think the electronic drums were just a minor, transient issue to begin with even if they didn't see it that way at the time) just to see what would have happened. I'll bet many of the arrangements would have been more dynamic, less blocky, sections would not run on needlessly, beeps and boops wouldn't have been as randomly tossed in, the sound wouldn't have been quite as dehumanizingly glossy or layered, Alex would have been featured more, and on and on. I think the albums would have been more cohesive and interesting overall. And I think all this would have happened even with the big 80s, new wave change in direction they were forging at the time.

How many more masterpieces did we miss out on due to their split? I conceptualize a Terry Brown New Rush as kind of what we got with Clockwork Angels but with better sound. That album was as close to a return to form as Rush ever got post-Broon. Of course, you need to adjust for specific era but that would have been the quality, probably better, I'd expect from that team had they stayed together.


Spot on. From day one with GuP they started aping the style of the day (or the year prior). From that point on they were playing catch-up stylistically - and then it was too late. They could’ve pushed the envelope through the 80s and 90s. They played it safe. Understandable. We got a decade of some genius up to 1982.

#16 fenderjazz

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 12:47 AM

It's a tricky thing innit? Clearly the best albums have Broon involvement yet Rush should be the boss creatively. Too bad they didn't come back around to Terry. Presto would have been a good time to do that. The eighties keyboard domination experiment was taken as far as they could and now it was time to rock out again. Presto and RTB would have been much better with Terry's input. But none of us were there. Sometimes you can never go back.


Yes this.

Presto RTB and Counterparts would have been so much better with Terry. That was the time.

#17 Three Eyes

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 09:42 AM

Fully agree, and - despite Signals being where they "knew" Terry had to go - I'd say Signals emphatically included. In fact, the fact that Rush felt Terry was doing the wrong stuff with Signals probably just shows how hard it is to be objective around your own material, something they've constantly commented on including here IIRC (I'm not rereading it, sorry).

 

Hell, FFS - Signals was ONE album after MP yet they were convinced the situation was stale and clearly going in the totally wrong direction, irretrievably?

 

Right! Terry was their objective ear and he seemed born to do that job. Why did they ax him after Signals? It wouldn't have been the first experimentally flawed but still tremendous album they'd done with him. They must have really yearned for relevancy in the rapidly changing musical environment of that time and felt Terry couldn't help them achieve that. I could see Geddy, the modern day worrier, in particular thinking it was a change or die thing. A lot of big '70s bands were jumping on the MTV 80s bandwagon and with quite a bit of success. I think those that didn't often found their careers fizzling. Thing is, they really unbalanced their ship when they threw Terry overboard. Some of the band's specialness disappeared after that, I think. They became a three legged animal.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#18 timbale

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 12:03 PM

Gonna take the devil's advocate position here...but we don't really know that Brown would have been the cure to the problems that exist in the later Rush albums.  The disagreements they had during Signals might point to the opposite.  Somewhere I've read that Brown was really not pleased with the bridge of Digital Man...which to me indicates he may have had a lot of issues with their songwriting throughout the 80's - that song's construction, which I love, feels very emblematic of their style for the next decade.

 

On some issues, I think a lot of us tend to side with Brown because we agree with his individual point, ie the electronic drums.  But as we see through the 80's, it is not at all the case that Peart "replaced" his drums with electronic drums.  I'm not a big fan of the electronic-only tunes like Red Sector A...but honestly they are few and far between.  It's a little like if Brown had balked at Peart bringing in tubular bells and glockenspiel in the mid-70's - it was not the death of him playing a rock drum kit.

 

And as a last point I would mention that, although we never know what is going on with people personally or artistically on the inside, so we'll never know, but I do think it's somewhat telling that Terry Brown never produced another substantial, important work after Rush split with him.  


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#19 Three Eyes

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 12:30 PM

And as a last point I would mention that, although we never know what is going on with people personally or artistically on the inside, so we'll never know, but I do think it's somewhat telling that Terry Brown never produced another substantial, important work after Rush split with him.  

 

I don't think what he did after Rush has much bearing on what he was able to do with Rush. It's a chemistry thing. He seemed to understand how to manage and enhance their idiosyncrasies while other producers seemed baffled by them or perhaps even tried to hide them under a glossy finish. I do realize the guys were co-conspirators in that process though.

 

But some producers are just unusually good matches with some bands. George Martin and the Beatles, for example. Ted Templeton produced Van Halen's first five albums.

 

But yeah there was stormy weather on the Signals project, for sure. Whether they could have gotten past it with another album is anybody's guess. Rush might think Signals was a fatal misstep in their professional relationship with Terry but I honestly wouldn't trade even just Subdivisions and Analogue Kid for several New Rush albums, maybe even their entire post-Terry catalog. 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#20 chemistry1973

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 02:20 PM

My cynicism tells me it was all about money. Moving Pitchers moved some serious units. They probably saw Terry’s take and flipped out. LOL

Producers got points on sales in those days...




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