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Listening to Clockwork Angels again


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#101 grep

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Posted 25 August 2018 - 03:21 PM

brickblock_420x280.jpg

 

Lead bricks. So metal, so dense.


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#102 Three Eyes

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Posted 25 August 2018 - 05:35 PM

The fact that all it does is boost your volume is just a little too perfect. lol.

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#103 Slim

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 09:01 AM

I'm sure you could also come up with a collection of classic rock and pop songs like that using the words "girl", "love" and "yeah" but like "baby" most of them will likely have some sort of contextual distinctiveness. The Millennial Whoop in contrast is hackneyed melody filler that appears to be grafted from one assembly line pop song to another to another to another and its frequent use has been mostly confined to the last 10 years or so.

 

I mostly agree in general about the state of chart music, but I'll have to disagree about the "millennial whoop" being a particular problem. Popular music reuses familiar motifs, and always has done. Dozens of late '50s pop songs seem to reuse the same four-chord sequence, in exactly the same tempo (you probably know the one I mean, the G-E-C-D thing assuming it's in G). There's a melody filler, a descending major pentatonic thing typically played on guitar, that's been used over and over again in the Blues. Rock music has guitar licks that are recycled endlessly from player to player, most lifted from the Blues.

 

It's just a fashion, like synth drums in Disco music or syrupy strings in '70s pop music, nothing new or of particular concern.



#104 Moving Target

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 10:15 AM

The fact that all it does is boost your volume is just a little too perfect. lol.
 

 

I can just imagine Nick R coming in with a suitcase of these, one per channel, all dialled to eleven.
 

 

Unable perversion

A symptom of Rush

That's mental, and it's mentally deranged

 

The album a turd, 'cos

production job sucks

It's far too in-your-face

destroys your brain


The impulse was pure
But sometimes the vision is thwarted
By producer interference

Signals get maxed
And the sound is distorted
The result is incoherence

A tired mind become a mix bricker
Nobody needs it any thicker
Nobody need this perverse brutality

Everybody got ears bleeding
From the compression of waveform
Please somebody dial it back to the norm



#105 Three Eyes

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 03:52 PM

I mostly agree in general about the state of chart music, but I'll have to disagree about the "millennial whoop" being a particular problem. Popular music reuses familiar motifs, and always has done. Dozens of late '50s pop songs seem to reuse the same four-chord sequence, in exactly the same tempo (you probably know the one I mean, the G-E-C-D thing assuming it's in G). There's a melody filler, a descending major pentatonic thing typically played on guitar, that's been used over and over again in the Blues. Rock music has guitar licks that are recycled endlessly from player to player, most lifted from the Blues.

 

It's just a fashion, like synth drums in Disco music or syrupy strings in '70s pop music, nothing new or of particular concern.

 

I agree that the millennial whoop in and of itself isn't the issue. It's just an interestingly pervasive and tell-tale symptom of the actual problem - that being the supremacy of infantilized, largely teen-targeted pop music that hasn't changed much since 2000 - a computer-gridded, assembly-line product created by a handful cynical uber producers. 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#106 SJS

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 04:18 PM

I agree that the millennial whoop in and of itself isn't the issue. It's just an interestingly pervasive and tell-tale symptom of the actual problem - that being the supremacy of infantilized, largely teen-targeted pop music that hasn't changed much since 2000 - a computer-gridded, assembly-line product created by a handful cynical uber producers. 

 

Hear the sound of music
Drifting in the aisles
Elevator Prozac
Stretching on for miles
The music of the future
Will not entertain
It's only meant to repress
And neutralize your brain
Soul gets squeezed out
Edges get blunt
Demographic
Gives what you want
Now the sound of music
Comes in silver pills
Engineered to suit you
Building cheaper thrills
The music of rebellion
Makes you want to rage
But it's made by millionaires
Who are nearly twice your age
One of the wonders of the world is going down
It's going down I know
It's one of the blunders of the world that no-one cares
No-one cares enough

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#107 Three Eyes

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 06:02 PM

^^^ Bitchin'.

 

Contrast that with the days when labels actively sought the "next big sound" scouting regional scenes with emerging styles like Merseybeat, folk, folk-rock, psychedelic, prog, experimental, fusion, singer/songwriter, southern rock, country rock, soul, funk, jazz-rock/pop, instrumental, punk, disco, hard rock, metal, rap, alternative, grunge, noise, etc. They developed artists in these styles for years across multiple albums often at a loss in the hopes they would eventually catch on with a public or at least a niche market ready for a new sound. Labels took risks in those days and sometimes the payoffs lead to big chart overhauls as an emerging style turned into a new pop or rock genre. Another nice thing about the time was that numerous styles could co-habit the chart at the same time offering diversity in listening and sometimes even leading to cross-pollination (Disco Kiss anyone? New Wave Alice Cooper?). And no small thing that bigger market radio DJ's from around the country had the power to break new and interesting underground artists based on taste alone instead of being required to play a list of market researched, fully processed acts handed down from corporate.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#108 Three Eyes

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 06:35 PM

What I don't understand is how these same conglomerates realized there was a market for the great original television we're getting these days and not realize there still must also be a market for smart, galvanizing music at the Top 40 level. When it comes to risk, TV production makes music production look like an investment in a lemonade stand.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#109 A Rebel and a Runner

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 07:26 PM

The most recent Musica Analytica tackled this a bit, and pointed something interesting out: we are taking a relatively narrow band of musical history as a trend, when it might just be deviation towards or away from a more general trend.  

One complaint, for instance, is that the timbre of modern music is very limited; the same instruments are used.  One of the MA guys responded with "man, have you seen how many piano sonatas were written in the Baroque period?  EVERY generation of music has limited tambre, based on the tastes of the time."
I'm not worried by this.  Good music is still being made, some of it in the mainstream, and as long as you're willing to look for quality while being blind to genre or popularity, you'll find it.


labente deinde paulatim disciplina velut desidentes primo mores sequatur animo, deinde ut magis magisque lapsi sint, tum ire coeperint praecipites, donec ad haec tempora quibus nec vitia nostra nec remedia pati possumus perventum est.

 

First our declining morals slid, bit by bit, and then our very national spirit.  Then the collapse became greater and greater, and our principles began to go, until at last, it has come to this age, in which we can bear neither our crimes nor the cure for them.

 
 

#110 Three Eyes

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 09:16 PM

^^^ I don't think the quoted comment recognizes the relatively rapid development of the wide variety of musical styles in the 60s, 70s and 80s.

 

I've long thought another problem facing popular music today is that its many genres may have finally hit a creative and stylistic ceiling. I haven't heard a lot of music, underground or mainstream, that's not derivative on its head. I really miss songwriting too. Where are the great songs? I liked some of the electronica, freak folk, and retro hybrids that were happening in the 2000s but, excepting Daft Punk, none of it really made it into the mainstream.

 

I guess, in theory, new styles could emerge spontaneously and independently on the web but I haven't seen that happen in a big way yet and really how could it if it's not going to be sponsored by the majors? It doesn't help that everyone seems afraid to not be cool.

 

I'm just pining for a time that will never return...to a sort of model that I feel spawned more creativity - regional music scenes developed and exploited by the majors. We live in a world of pre-fab iTunes singles, unimaginative Spotify playlist curators, corporate controlled radio pop, and genre prisons (I mean genre labels). :)

 

However, one thing I have not discounted yet is that I am old. lol.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#111 Three Eyes

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Posted 26 August 2018 - 10:11 PM

Another thing that likely eroded creative mainstream music into the kind of McPop / genre box happy meals we're served today is the Telecommunications Act of 1996.
 

In the 1970s and 1980s, a combination of technological change, court decisions, and changes in U.S. policy permitted competitive entry into some telecommunications and broadcast markets. In this context, the 1996 Telecommunications Act was designed to allow fewer, but larger corporations, to operate more media enterprises within a sector (such as Clear Channel's dominance in radio), and to expand across media sectors (through relaxation of cross-ownership rules), thus enabling massive and historic consolidation of media in the United States. These changes amounted to a near-total rollback of New Deal market regulation.

 

Over time the amount of media merging has increased and the number of media outlets have increased. That translates to fewer companies owning more media outlets, increasing the concentration of ownership. In 1983, 90% of US media was controlled by 50 companies; today, 90% is controlled by just 6 companies.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#112 EZrhythm

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Posted 27 August 2018 - 07:21 AM

The fact that all it does is boost your volume is just a little too perfect. lol.

So through out the video they have someone "merely play" a relaxed riff with no difference in volume? For what TC Electronics charge for their products I expect a better demo.



#113 chemistry1973

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Posted 13 September 2018 - 06:30 PM

@ARaaR

 

Pretty good!

 

 



#114 Three Eyes

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Posted 13 September 2018 - 07:08 PM

^^^ Beautiful! One of Geddy's most enchanting melodies.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#115 chemistry1973

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Posted 13 September 2018 - 08:42 PM

Yeah man I just listened to their entire Rush tribute record.

It’s not bad at all.

https://open.spotify...kTEe223JPLXQ3Cg

#116 Three Eyes

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Posted 14 September 2018 - 06:06 AM

^^^ I'll give it a listen next chance I get.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#117 Modern Day Warrior

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Posted 22 September 2018 - 08:15 PM

Clockwork Angels would have been more enjoyable if they had a different producer than Nick R. There’s just to much layering and overdubs on that album that it makes the mixing of that record so congested. Nothing breathes on the album. Just because technology today can allow up to 132 tracks or however many can be used doesn’t mean you have to use all of them. Neil’s drums alone probably take 72 tracks alone. Sometimes minimal is better.




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