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The Rick Beato Thread


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#1 Three Eyes

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 03:09 AM

His content is great for musicians and since no small portion of Rush fans are musicians...

 

He has a wide array of musical interests, with an emphasis on guitar, from jazz to blues to classical to rock of nearly every stripe and era and has a deep understanding of music theory and studio recording techniques. Oh and after decades as a producer he has an insider's view of how the music business works. Two of my favorite things about him are his enthusiasm for music and his skill as a communicator and storyteller.

 

His latest...

 

In this episode we discuss the Van Halen Effect and the future of guitar virtuosos.
 

Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#2 Three Eyes

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 08:28 AM

Rick gives perspective on the "Stairway to Heaven" copyright lawsuit.

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#3 Three Eyes

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 07:07 PM

If you're a Frampton admirer like myself you'll like this sit down interview. Lots of Frampton Comes Alive talk.

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#4 Three Eyes

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 07:19 PM

Jazz players and aficionados tend to hate the critically well regarded film Whiplash which earned J.K. Simmons an Academy Award as the tough-as-nails band professor and which has a rating of 93% at Rotten Tomatoes. Here''s why.

 

(For the record, I really liked the film but I've never really followed the world of jazz and know little of its sacred precepts.)

 

 

 

 

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#5 chemistry1973

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 07:33 PM

Jazz players and aficionados tend to hate the critically well regarded film Whiplash which earned J.K. Simmons an Academy Award as the tough-as-nails band professor and which has a rating of 93% at Rotten Tomatoes. Here''s why.

(For the record, I really liked the film but I've never really followed the world of jazz and know little of its sacred precepts.)



Yes - I’ve heard this argument.

I’m a drummer. And I loved Whiplash. I don’t believe it’s really about drumming. It’s an allegory. A metaphor for life and all that. There is tons of subtext and nuance to this movie and drumming is just the ornamental part of it.

It’s a very subtle smart film.

#6 chemistry1973

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 07:40 PM

The movie, for me, is about race and entitlement.

The whole concept of going to school for jazz is comedic and ironic. White kid - who deserves to be appreciated for his effort - stil won't learn anything about music until he gets out of the institution of learning.

The teacher is in a state of near rage because he's in a place that kills art. The teacher is rebelling against the regiment of school too. You're not going to develop feel and deliver music convincingly without being alive.

There's an early scene where we see the kids apartment or dorm: nothing but white drummers on his wall - no Max Roach, Tony Williams, Papa Jo Jones --- Theres Buddy Rich, and maybe Gene Krupa.

Then we see the supposedly psycho instructor with his band later in the film. He's happy - playing music with people who have been forced to understand it: seasoned African American musos.

The main character wonders "why am I being so brutalized?" when he really hasn't hasn't experienced FUCK ALL.

#7 Three Eyes

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 09:44 PM

The movie, for me, is about race and entitlement. 
 
The whole concept of going to school for jazz is comedic and ironic. White kid - who deserves to be appreciated for his effort - stil won't learn anything about music until he gets out of the institution of learning.
 
The teacher is in a state of near rage because he's in a place that kills art. The teacher is rebelling against the regiment of school too. You're not going to develop feel and deliver music convincingly without being alive.
 
There's an early scene where we see the kids apartment or dorm: nothing but white drummers on his wall - no Max Roach, Tony Williams, Papa Jo Jones --- Theres Buddy Rich, and maybe Gene Krupa.
 
Then we see the supposedly psycho drummer with his band later in the film. He's happy - playing music with people who have been forced to understand it: seasoned African American musos.
 
The main character wonders "why am I being so brutalized?" when he really hasn't hasn't experienced FUCK ALL.

 

Interesting thoughts that probably go a bit deeper than my takeaway. One could also ask if the instructor knows that the drummer has a great undeveloped talent and secretly hates him for it because he knows one day he'll make a living at it while he has to supplement his performing career with a teaching job. More metaphorically speaking, the instructor might be the proverbial Satan who takes the drummer's soul in exchange for musical greatness.

 

To me, the movie is not an inside baseball depiction of the jazz world. Jazzers take it too literally and Rick really should watch the movie itself and review that instead of just the trailer. Like it or not, many committed jazzers are highly judgmental about performance and the band professor character just takes that sort of attitude to an exaggerated level. I think the movie, generally speaking, is about obsession to perfection and how the obstacles that might seem to be preventing that goal could actually be helping to achieve it. It's a paying your dues movie that I think poses a thorny question: Can abuse, sometimes to the point of damaging a person psychologically, motivate that person to professional greatness, even if it's out of hatred for the one applying the abuse? And this concept can apply to any mentor/protege relationship in any discipline, trade or profession, not just jazz.

 

SPOILER: The drummer does give a triumphant performance in front of a live audience at the end but you sense that it's been at a cost and the question is was the cost worth it?

 

Rick has an excellent but long video called "Why Do People Hate Jazz?" where he interacts in conversational style with his viewers, and provides some some cool insights into this world; one being that there have been only 34 gold or platinum records since jazz began. This is a difficult genre to find success in, and that in itself, kind of gives some credibility to what Whiplash has to say about achieving professional success in the insolated world of traditional jazz.

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#8 Three Eyes

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 10:13 PM

The teacher is in a state of near rage because he's in a place that kills art. The teacher is rebelling against the regiment of school too. You're not going to develop feel and deliver music convincingly without being alive.

 

It's interesting that you say this here because watching the Beato/Frampton video it's obvious Frampton is not as musically learned as the former college jazz guitar teaching Rick yet Frampton is the star here and the one who's famous for his great feel, especially in his soloing.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#9 chemistry1973

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 12:27 AM

Dude totally.

 

Though the Jazz greats were geniuses, and many had degrees in music, the greats were ones that played in bands, and toured and weathered the conditions of the road. That LIFE a drugs, and booze, and pain. That came through in the music.

 

Jazz suffers (suffered) from overly schooled dudes who were worried about notes and technique and bland melodies made with bad sounds. Kind of Blue is beautiful and will hold up forever. The first Chick Corea Elektric Band record, as much as I love it, is dated as fuck, and impossible for any punter to enjoy. These Berklee Music guys who shred are great for picking up ideas about technique, and great to watch for a few minutes. But it's flash and meant to grab attention. 

The rock world is not much different. 

 

I love watching some of these olympic level drummers shredding on youtube - it's fun to watch. But it's not really music. Would they understand how to create a song with their abilities? Create space and transitions? Understand the dynamics that can shape an entire song? I'd say "no" for most of them.



#10 fenderjazz

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 03:40 PM

I love watching some of these olympic level drummers shredding on youtube - it's fun to watch. But it's not really music. Would they understand how to create a song with their abilities? Create space and transitions? Understand the dynamics that can shape an entire song? I'd say "no" for most of them.

 

Bingo!

 

Technique and innovation only gets you so far.  Music is about how it makes you feel.  I know that sounds counter to what a lot of people say about Rush, but Rush has rarely suffered from excess for the sake of excess.  Typically their excess served the song.

 

Playing with people is key.  The communication aspect of music is paramount.  As you've said, the jazz players who played out on the road are the ones to be admired, often for what they did on the road rather than the studio.  Jazz, like blues, is about the musicians communicating and reacting.  When you bring someone who is jazz-based into rock, you can often see the contrast.  Certain players, drummers in particular, can be very hard to play with because you expect them to hold things down while others are going off.  Peart seems to be a great base for Rush because of the very thing a lot of people criticize him over, his playing of straight meter.  His sense of timing works wonderfully when he also gets his solo "moments" ie "Tom Sawyer" etc. because he can go out and come back in so easily.  There has to be moments in all music where one holds it down and the other players can go off.  In Rush, and The Who, they just take turns.



#11 Three Eyes

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Posted 09 December 2018 - 06:40 AM

This is a real treat. Rick and his friend Tim Smith recreate The Beatles' "The End" one track at a time.

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.





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