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Name That Influence


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#21 chemistry1973

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Posted 30 August 2018 - 12:27 AM

Coincidentally I heard a replay of a 2010 interview with Billy Joel on Howard Stern the other day. Billy has a different story on the influence. Wiki had the quote, which is nice because my memory sucks...


I listened to Rag Doll and the only thing in common is the last lyric. You can also clearly hear the Uptown Girl melody. That said, I think Billy did rip off 10cc, but his memory is apparently worse than mine.


Wow you can hear so much. I hear three Billy Joel songs and the entirety of Bruce Springsteen’s 1970s catalogue.

And it’s a beautiful song on its own.

#22 Three Eyes

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Posted 30 August 2018 - 12:49 AM

Rag Doll is such a great song.

 

Good catch. If Joel hadn't said Just the Way You Are was influenced by Rag Doll, I would have never known.

 

I hadn't realized how just how much Uptown Girl was influenced by the Four Seasons. Joel even does a spot on imitation of Frankie Valli and the song itself could have been a Four Seasons song.

 

I wonder how they came with the idea to use that 10cc style arrangement. It kind of seems at odds at times with the melody and chords but it's kind of perfect for it too. Adds a delicate, gossamer backdrop to an already soft song.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#23 The Macallan

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Posted 31 August 2018 - 01:14 PM

I'm a big fan of Billy. His arrangements are amazing, even if he did rip off something here and there. Hard to believe he's not made any new music in 25 years...although, considering River of Dreams maybe that's a good thing. I consider him the Sandy Koufax of popular music...he had an amazing 'hall of fame' run there, then he kinda lost it in a hurry.

 

Side 1 of 'The Stranger' is one of those perfect album sides out there:

Movin' Out

The Stranger

Just the Way You Are

Scenes from an Italian Restaurant.


neil-presto-scarf.jpg


#24 chemistry1973

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Posted 31 August 2018 - 01:57 PM

Joel’s songs are basically on a loathe/love rating for me.

His hits are brilliant but his deeper cuts, to me, are a coin toss. So much filler.

He’d be a lounge singer in Branson Missouri without Liberty Devitto too.

#25 Three Eyes

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Posted 06 October 2018 - 11:36 PM

The doot-doots in The Spinner's "Rubberband Man" (1976) remind me of the doot-doots in Stephen Stills' "Love the One You're With" (1971).

 

@ 3:14

 

 

 

@ 3:52

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#26 Three Eyes

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 07:33 AM

Styx's "Prelude 12" (1975) and Rik Emmett's "Moonchild" (1976) have similar qualities....especially at the following time stamps...

 

@ 0.53

 

 

@ 4:28

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#27 Three Eyes

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 01:51 AM

Inara George's general vocal style reminds me of Astrud Gilberto's vocals on "The Girl From Ipanema."

 

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#28 Three Eyes

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 01:05 PM

I think a section in Steve Hackett's "Narnia" (1978) sounds kind of similar to the opening of 10cc's "The Things We Do For Love." (1977)

 

2:12

 

 

0:04 and 2:18

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#29 fenderjazz

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 03:28 PM

Joel’s songs are basically on a loathe/love rating for me.

His hits are brilliant but his deeper cuts, to me, are a coin toss. So much filler.

He’d be a lounge singer in Branson Missouri without Liberty Devitto too.


He had a kickass band back then. Now not as much

#30 Three Eyes

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 02:22 PM

The Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons influence on "Here Comes That Rainy Day Feeling Again" (1971) is about as subtle as a sledgehammer to the skull.

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#31 Three Eyes

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 04:56 AM

Not so much an influence as a coincidence but Smokin' in the Boys Room (1973) and In The Mood (1974) have similar sounding buttons, to my ears. At the very, very ends of both songs.

 

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#32 Slim

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 09:17 AM

The hook (13 seconds in, and repeated later) in Mahogany Rush's Satisfy Your Soul strongly reminds me of the theme music to an old, and very popular TV game show called The Generation Game

 

 



#33 Slim

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 09:39 AM

And on a similar theme, The Motors' Forget About You is famously derived, though as far as I remember they never admitted it, from the theme of the BBC's long-running Saturday sport show, Grandstand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I really liked The Motors. They were one of those pub rock bands clinging onto the coat tails of Punk. In the late summer of '77 returning from a holiday in Spain, we came back up through London and every few minutes you'd see an "Actually I prefer the Motors" poster pasted over some hoarding advertising something else; quite a novel ad campaign. I'd never heard of them before that.

 

I recall their guitar player Bram Tchaikovsky wearing a WW2 German uniform on Top Of The Pops, something you'd never get away with now.

 

Good band, I think their problem was that they didn't have a singer. Their bass player (playing keyboards in that one) and rhythm guitar player used to take turns on vocal duties and they were gruff shouters really, not singers.



#34 chemistry1973

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 02:39 PM

Directly influenced by the Dr. Who theme.




More info:

"Embryo" was the first Pink Floyd songs to contain an excerpt of the theme, appearing in live performances in 1971, although in Embryo only the first two bars of the theme would play, as opposed to a much longer segment in Cymbaline. Oddly, these two songs were often performed at the same concerts. "One of These Days", the opening track of Pink Floyd's 1971 album Meddle, echoes the theme about 3 minutes into the track. The reference was made more explicit in live performances.[17] In addition, their song "Sheep" has a bassline very similar to the theme song's bassline and the opening 3 notes of the main theme are played at 06.47, whilst live performances featured a much longer excerpt of the theme.

#35 Slim

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 04:26 PM

The strangest thing about that tune is that it's apparently aimed at Jimmy (later Sir Jimmy) Young, the BBC broadcaster who died in 2016, at the age of 95.

 

jy.jpg

 

The unusual, strangulated vocal is Nick Mason.



#36 chemistry1973

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 05:07 PM

Yeah I guess the Floyd found him overly talkative. That’s pretty dark to threaten his life, though.

#37 Three Eyes

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 08:04 PM

The hook (13 seconds in, and repeated later) in Mahogany Rush's Satisfy Your Soul strongly reminds me of the theme music to an old, and very popular TV game show called The Generation Game

 

Haha, yes that does sound like game show music.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#38 Three Eyes

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 08:30 PM

And on a similar theme, The Motors' Forget About You is famously derived, though as far as I remember they never admitted it, from the theme of the BBC's long-running Saturday sport show, Grandstand.

 

 

 

Man, that chorus also sounds a lot like the chorus from The Grass Roots' "Sooner or Later" which was a hit in the US in 1971.

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#39 Three Eyes

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 08:49 PM

BBC's long-running Saturday sport show, Grandstand.

 

 

That is really fun and quite reminiscent of the Philly Soul sound, a highly commercialized, feel-good version of soul that targeted mainstream American audiences in the early '70s. Vocal groups like The Spinners and The O'Jays were among its biggest names.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#40 Slim

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 11:04 PM

Tracy Chapman's Give Me One Reason is, I think, a retread of Cream's Outside Woman Blues

 

 

 

I'm sure there's a video somewhere on YouTube of Clapton playing on Give Me One Reason with her. He must have noticed.






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