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A new appreciation for songs you've heard hundreds of times?


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#1 jeffro

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 03:28 PM

Decided to fire up Grace Under Pressure this morning. Never one of my favorite Rush albums (I know, weird, for a Rush fan). Anyway, I get to The Body Electric and this feeling hits me right in the face. I can't really explain it further, I just suddenly have what amounts to a new appreciation for this song. I've heard it many, many times over the last 30+ years and I don't recall it having this kind of an effect on me. I suddenly like it now more than ever.

 

Has this ever happened to you, Rush or not? I can recall this also happening to me many years ago with the Triumph song, In The Night. 


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#2 fenderjazz

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 03:39 PM

I think when you listen to a song like that in 1984, it was more common to hear something like that.  Fast forward to now and you get a bit nostalgic maybe for the synth sounds and reverb that were ubiquitous back then.  I get what they were trying to do here.  They were basically trying to fit into the 80s pop song era with some of their prog rock identity intact.  This was never one of my favorite songs, either then or now because it's something that tried too hard to feel futuristic.  I've always preferred more classic/organic sounds.

 

I have gained new appreciation for the Jake E Lee era of Ozzy Osbourne.  Some of the music can be cheesy from that era, especially the synth sounds, but Jake E Lee was probably the best guitarist Ozzy ever had.  I know that's sacrilege to many who prefer RR but trying playing the Jake E Lee stuff well, vs Rhodes and you'll see what I mean.



#3 timbale

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 03:44 PM

I find that when I have one of those moments you're describing, it almost always has to do with an emotional connection to Geddy's vocal performance - the marriage of his voice, the melody and the lyrics.  In the bombast and flashiness of Rush's performances, I find it easy to forget about the most basic connection to the songs, which I think for most people (not all) comes through the human voice.

 

This happened to me very recently with Time Stand Still.  It's not like it hit me in a new way - although, I suppose as I continue to age it becomes more relevant - it's just that it struck me how sincerely he was singing it.  There is an intention behind it, like he's really singing those words, not simply the sound of those words over the music (which I think he can be somewhat fairly accused of on some of the later material...)  

 

I also recently watched the live version of The Pass from the Presto tour footage they put out a while ago, and had a very similar feeling.


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#4 chemistry1973

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 04:58 PM

I find that when I have one of those moments you're describing, it almost always has to do with an emotional connection to Geddy's vocal performance - the marriage of his voice, the melody and the lyrics. In the bombast and flashiness of Rush's performances, I find it easy to forget about the most basic connection to the songs, which I think for most people (not all) comes through the human voice.

This happened to me very recently with Time Stand Still. It's not like it hit me in a new way - although, I suppose as I continue to age it becomes more relevant - it's just that it struck me how sincerely he was singing it. There is an intention behind it, like he's really singing those words, not simply the sound of those words over the music (which I think he can be somewhat fairly accused of on some of the later material...)

I also recently watched the live version of The Pass from the Presto tour footage they put out a while ago, and had a very similar feeling.

Yes- there is a conviction to the way Geddy sings these songs.

And I love his vocal approach on GuP- it’s poppy but aggressive. He doesn’t really get that way on subsequent records. His performances on Afterimage and Between the Wheels are straight-up great.

#5 Pariah Dawg

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 10:33 PM

Drugs definitely help. But yeah, I get this a lot with Dylan. With such a vast catalog, it’s not unusual for a song to go unnoticed, forgotten or ignored then smack you upside the head one day when you least expect it.
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#6 EZrhythm

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 04:10 AM

Lately it's been the whole Led Zeppelin catalog. I have never owned any of their albums but have always enjoyed a few of their tunes such as The Immigrant Song, Misty Mountain Hop and The Song Remains the Same. Now I have discovered their live recordings and songs like Kashmir just pop out of it's shell.



#7 Slim

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 11:56 AM

It's funny how songs can sometimes "click" when you've heard them dozens of times and never particularly liked them. I never much liked Whispers And Moans on the Crowded House album Woodface, but many years after I first bought it and listened to it - about 20 years, actually - I saw a live version on YouTube and I just "got it".

 

 

One of the greatest ever songs. Full stop.



#8 jeffro

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 02:22 PM

I think when you listen to a song like that in 1984, it was more common to hear something like that.  Fast forward to now and you get a bit nostalgic maybe for the synth sounds and reverb that were ubiquitous back then.  I get what they were trying to do here.  They were basically trying to fit into the 80s pop song era with some of their prog rock identity intact.  This was never one of my favorite songs, either then or now because it's something that tried too hard to feel futuristic.  I've always preferred more classic/organic sounds.

 

Generally, I agree. I too prefer more classic/organic sounds. The proliferation of synth in music in the 80s went too far for me. I'm torn as it applies to Rush. While GuP has never been a favorite of mine, Power Windows is. It's my favorite of the post moving pictures records. I know some think it to be too produced and sterile but I consider it to be the high point of their 80s experiment. Hold Your Fire is up there as well. 

I almost wish Geddy had not embraced keyboards as fully as he did. I would have preferred that Neil not gone the electronic drums route either. However, had they done that, their 80s music would have been quite different. For some that would be seen as preferable. For me, I'm not nearly so sure.  


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#9 Andrush

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 05:51 PM

GuP has a special place for me.  I was in high school when this came out.  Being that it was in my formative years, it definitely marks one of those points.  I didn't understand then why they went synth, but I can't say I really cared.  Now when I listen to it, I agree that Geddy has an almost desperate passion to his voice.  

 

That said, I just listened again to Caress of Steel yesterday.  Pull away Geddy's way too high vocals, and this album is much better than people give it credit for.



#10 AnalogKid

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Posted 02 February 2018 - 11:15 PM



#11 chemistry1973

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Posted 02 February 2018 - 11:50 PM


Peart is bringin’ it.

#12 Three Eyes

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Posted 02 February 2018 - 11:53 PM

 

I really love Rod Barchetta from this one.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#13 AnalogKid

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 12:00 AM

Peart is bringin’ it.

They all are. Wish there was video, but at least it's an SB recording.



#14 jeffro

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 03:05 AM

I really love Rod Barchetta from this one.

 

Tim Sawyer is pretty good too


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#15 chemistry1973

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 09:45 PM

Remember those parties at Rod Barchetta’s house back in the day? So epic.




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