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Things I can go the rest of my life without ever hearing again


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#21 fenderjazz

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 02:52 PM

Nice one. They really don't. I think there are multiple reasons why they don't. They are the American Idol generation; the music as marketing tool generation; the it's not cool to try generation; the free music generation; selfie generation; hipster generation; internet troll generation; exaltation of the DJ generation; prefab sound plugin generation; content glut generation (glut that distracts from and lessens music's importance in their lives); etc., etc.

 

There were just certain rules in our generation that don't apply to millenials and Z gen kids.  We had an authenticity rule.  If you didn't write your own songs, play your own instruments, sing your own songs, you didn't qualify.  The Monkees were shunned because they didn't play their own instruments (on the show and on the early records, later they did).  Milli Vanili left the world stage over a lip syncing error!  Today authenticity doesn't matter.  It doesn't matter if it takes 20 people to write a Beyonce song and 35 to produce it and we never see a musician ever.  Nobody cares.  They just want the instant gratification.  The only edge in their music is rap.  Rap is the new distorted guitar/metal/grunge/etc.  The problem with rap is often it's lack of authenticity too.  Typically it's a conglomeration of samples to which words are rapped over.  Again the musicians are not seen.  It's not even called music, the whole track is called a "beat".  Music is dead, dead, dead. :(



#22 SJS

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 03:53 PM

Somehow "play a factor" became an expression, especially on sports talk radio.  "The weather could really play a factor in this game."  That really hurts my ears.  The weather could be a factor.  The weather could play a role.  But play a factor?!

 

Impactful is maybe a real word, but I hate it.  Her testimony was so impactful.  Impactful makes me think of a dental problem.  Her testimony had an impact.  (I am pleased to see a red wavy line underneath impactful, so maybe it's not a word after all.)

 

Misnomer is a fine word, but ouch it hurts when used incorrectly.  It does not mean "error".  People say that the Beatles started the British invasion, but that's a misnomer.  There were other bands that came first.  Ouch, no.  Misnomer describes a term that is not apt because it means something else - it does not mean any type of error or misunderstanding. 

 

I recently watched a rerun of a Curb Your Enthusiasm episode where Jerry Seinfeld was complaining about people's use of "That being said" to negate what had come before.  A similar verbal hedge is "and rightfully so" which is often used annoyingly for the same purpose.  The fans complained about that call - and rightfully so - although really the refs had it right.


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#23 Slim

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 04:11 PM

Interesting stuff. I haven't heard "play a factor" but it's clearly a conflation of two very similar expressions, ie "play a part" and "be a factor". I've heard other examples of the same phenomenon but can't remember any at the moment.

 

I don't think anyone in the UK uses "impactful" yet, but it may only be a matter of time.

 

I heard the "misnomer" one used only yesterday to mean "misconception", but not involving a name. It grates. Another similar one is "as such". A lot of people seem not to understand that it has a particular application. It doesn't just mean "therefore".

 

 

Never heard the "and rightfully so" one so far. That's bizarre.



#24 Contentment

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 04:34 PM

If Freddie was still alive,  I would totally agree with him.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=JhH1Bx_B3po



#25 jeffro

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 06:51 PM

There are a couple phrases/buzzwords I keep hearing lately that I never need to hear again.

 

"Game changer" (Have you noticed how everything these days is a game changer?)

"Not for nothing" (What does this even mean? Yes, I looked it up and I still don't get why people use it.)

 

Oh and put me down for no more Ed Sheeran as well.  Barf!

 

"Dilly Dilly" (Here's a little piece of advice Budweiser, Instead of coming up with catchy ad phrases, how about making a beer that doesn't taste like piss. Friends don't let friends drink Bud)

 

And if I hear that stupid whip nae nae song again, I can't be responsible for my actions. I'd like to find the guy who wrote that garbage and, to paraphrase Buford T Justice, punch him in the mouth  


Pure fat, topped with a layer of fat - Alex Lifeson
 
Rush02.JPG

 

 

 


#26 chemistry1973

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 07:14 PM

“At the end of the day...”

It’s the nonalcoholic beer of all expressions.

#27 The Macallan

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 07:54 PM

I was going to go with that one...but at the end of the day, does it really matter? Right, I'll choose another

 

 

"Friendly reminder" is big in email lingo. I've got 18 things to get done and someone sent me a request a few days ago which I've prioritized as #19. Today they followed up stating "this is a friendly reminder...see below". Of course it implies that future follow ups will get ugly and there will be consequences. 

 

 

I am often tempted to respond with something along the lines of, "F#%k you!" Alas, I just ignore.


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#28 AsIfToFly

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 11:29 PM

“At the end of the day...”

It’s the nonalcoholic beer of all expressions.

I was thinking of that one too. Had a boss who said that all the time. Drove me crazy.

But that’s a mute point. ;)

#29 baldiepete

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 11:40 PM

“At the end of the day...”

 

 

Why do you hate Spock's Beard ? ;)



#30 SJS

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 12:02 AM

I read “agreeance” in a student paper today to mean agreement.

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#31 RushDoggie

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 03:36 AM

"it's all in how you raise them."

 

Arrrgh no. No no no. Genetics matter.


“Music is probably the only real magic I have encountered in my life. It's pure and it's real. It moves, it heals.” - Tom Petty

 

 


#32 RushDoggie

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 04:11 AM

Pet parent.

 

Fur Mommy.


“Music is probably the only real magic I have encountered in my life. It's pure and it's real. It moves, it heals.” - Tom Petty

 

 


#33 Three Eyes

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 10:42 AM

You guys are taking away my entire vocabulary.  :(


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#34 jeffro

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 12:08 PM

You guys are taking away my entire vocabulary.  :(

 

At the end of the day, it will all come out in the wash


Pure fat, topped with a layer of fat - Alex Lifeson
 
Rush02.JPG

 

 

 


#35 Contentment

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 05:55 PM

At the end of the day, it will all come out in the wash

 

Back in the day, it's how you played the game.



#36 Rick N Backer

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 08:35 PM

Any song that's played on "classic rock" radio.  Exception - the 5 or 6 Rush songs, but I will hear them on MY terms...



#37 pjbear05

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 10:34 PM

Any song that's played on "classic rock" radio.  Exception - the 5 or 6 Rush songs, but I will hear them on MY terms...

5 or 6? Damn, you are blessed. The local shitebag CR station here has played TSOR, TS, and Limelight, but no other Rush.

"Can't help about the shape I'm in, I can't sing, I ain't pretty, and my legs are thin.

But don't ask me what I think of you, I might not give the answer that you want me to."

 

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy."

 

 

 


#38 SJS

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 02:38 AM

Abbreviations for medical conditions. RA. COPD. ED. Low T. Just use the name, I actually can handle four syllable words.

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#39 Three Eyes

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 04:25 AM

Abbreviations for medical conditions. RA. COPD. ED. Low T. Just use the name, I actually can handle four syllable words.

 

I've got a bad case of TS. But not to worry, the doc put me on TSOR to combat it.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#40 A Rebel and a Runner

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 04:39 AM

Interestingly - or I think so, anyway - the word "like" is used by the working classes of North-East England as a multi-purpose verbal filler. This is not a new thing, it's been used like this all my life. My Dad used to do it; I'm afraid he could be rather common.

 

It can mean something like "then", "you see", or "though", depending on context. Or almost nothing.

 

Examples: for best effect please imagine the following as being read in a broad Teesside accent.

 

"Where'd you get the car, mate?"

 

"What's it got to do with you, like?"

 

and

 

"Our lass got palatic on the vodka last night. She doesn't normally touch it, like"

Reading a lot of Latin lately and it's funny how, as I get back into the swing of reading it (rather than translating it) I treat their postpositives and conjunctions (iam, donec, etiam, etsi, ergo, quidem, tamen, autem, etc.) almost like verbal filler, simply because their original purpose (to replace punctuation) is no longer necessary, since I read most texts in a post-Medieval form, with punctuation lovingly provided by millennium-dead monks.  And it got me wondering, what sort of filler words appear in other languages.

I know local Spanish-speakers love "pero" to cover pauses.

 

As for the topic at hand, the sentence "We were supposed to do that work, Mr. Check?"  No, you little shithead, I printed it out and handed it to you, or wrote it on the board and ASSIGNED IT TO YOU to make myself feel better.


labente deinde paulatim disciplina velut desidentes primo mores sequatur animo, deinde ut magis magisque lapsi sint, tum ire coeperint praecipites, donec ad haec tempora quibus nec vitia nostra nec remedia pati possumus perventum est.

 

First our declining morals slid, bit by bit, and then our very national spirit.  Then the collapse became greater and greater, and our principles began to go, until at last, it has come to this age, in which we can bear neither our crimes nor the cure for them.

 
 




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