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Vapot Trails Analog Style!

WARM SEPARATED

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#1 EZrhythm

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 01:56 AM

This is posted in the S&A Analog thread but after listening THIS DESERVES IT'S OWN THREAD!

 

The guy warmed up VT by throwing it on to a Maxell XLIIS cassette tape using my Nakamichi tape deck! INCREDIBLE SOUND!

 

NOW THIS IS HOW THE ALBUM WAS MEANT TO BE HEARD!

 

https://youtu.be/Mf7fM2fm9Qo?t=16m45s

 

* Vapot guh lol


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#2 Slim

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 03:03 PM

That's great - you can't polish one, but you can warm one up.

 

I recall that Neil Young used to do essentially the same thing, transfer his albums to tape (not necessarily cassette tape) before they were mastered.

 

This is essentially why vinyl sounds better for some people. Some go on to make the assumption that it's more accurate or true to the original, but like this cassette recording - it isn't.


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#3 SpaceGhost2112

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 10:50 PM

No.  <_<  *smh* Just cuz the kick has more kick doesn't mean the rest of the recording sounds any better.



#4 jeffro

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 12:33 AM

I love Vapot Trails


Pure fat, topped with a layer of fat - Alex Lifeson

 

The sewer pipe queen

Dangles my dream
Makes all that I've seen
Seem so obscene - Kings X, Skeptical Winds


#5 Three Eyes

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 01:25 AM

Is there a way to remaster the songwriting?


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Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#6 EZrhythm

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 02:50 AM

Interesting how this came from a random YouTuber and not a sound engineer, tech, Al,Ged, (Neil not included),techie RUSH fan, etc.



#7 TimC

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 02:30 PM

I wonder if he saturated the tape with that Dragon. Roy Thomas Baker has mentioned doing this a lot....



#8 fenderjazz

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 02:39 PM

The limitations of the format are its advantage sometimes


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#9 Peter Griffin

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 09:08 PM

That's great - you can't polish one, but you can warm one up.

I recall that Neil Young used to do essentially the same thing, transfer his albums to tape (not necessarily cassette tape) before they were mastered.

This is essentially why vinyl sounds better for some people. Some go on to make the assumption that it's more accurate or true to the original, but like this cassette recording - it isn't.


It's a known fact that vinyl is much more accurate to the original recorded sound. If you care to learn about it, some information can be found here:

https://electronics....question487.htm

A vinyl record has a groove carved into it that mirrors the original sound's waveform. This means that no information is lost. The output of a record player is analog. It can be fed directly to your amplifier with no conversion.

This means that the waveforms from a vinyl recording can be much more accurate, and that can be heard in the richness of the sound.


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#10 Slim

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 11:35 PM

It's a known fact that vinyl is much more accurate to the original recorded sound. If you care to learn about it, some information can be found here:

https://electronics....question487.htm
 

 

It isn't. That's a well-worn myth, and some of the statements in that piece are simply false.

 

I wrote a piece about high-definition audio here a few years ago:

 

.. which while not about vinyl, explains the reality about some of the misconceptions about digital audio which are repeated in that piece.

 

http://www.jamesgibb...tion-audio-con/


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#11 TimC

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 03:55 AM

The limitations of the format are its advantage sometimes

 

Heh, a Nak Dragon basically doesn't have the limitations of the format.



#12 EZrhythm

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 06:56 AM

The youtuber actually didn't say his VT recording is from vinyl. He said (On the S&A Side One page) that the S&A recording is from CD but never mentions what the VT source was. Since he calls himself Vinyl Man, too bad it isn't actually from vinyl.



#13 fenderjazz

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 03:15 PM

It isn't. That's a well-worn myth, and some of the statements in that piece are simply false.

 

I wrote a piece about high-definition audio here a few years ago:

 

.. which while not about vinyl, explains the reality about some of the misconceptions about digital audio which are repeated in that piece.

 

http://www.jamesgibb...tion-audio-con/

 

No arguement that high definition digital is not a better reproduction.  The problem lies in the original recording/mastering.  As I said above, the limitations of the format are it's advantage with analogue.  You can't overmodulate on vinyl because the needle would vibrate off of the record. Tape sounds like mud overmodulated and hiss is a factor no matter what (and the biggest reason why digital is better).  My point is better sometimes isn't better.  Ideally I would like to see digital recordings made the way records were in the late 70s which I feel was the peak in terms of audiophile production.  It's when everyone had great stereos and that is what albums were mixed towards, not an iphone or samsung galaxy earphones or stock car stereo speakers.


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#14 Rick N Backer

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 12:27 AM

Now THAT was an enjoyable listen.  I hope he does the rest of the album.


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#15 EZrhythm

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 09:45 AM

Me too. I asked him but haven't heard back.



#16 Peter Griffin

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 01:11 AM

It isn't. That's a well-worn myth, and some of the statements in that piece are simply false.

 

I wrote a piece about high-definition audio here a few years ago:

 

.. which while not about vinyl, explains the reality about some of the misconceptions about digital audio which are repeated in that piece.

 

http://www.jamesgibb...tion-audio-con/

 

Interesting.  You are right on this one.

 

I found this article as well which helped to clear up the vinyl vs. CD debate.

 

https://phys.org/new...-vinyl-cds.html


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