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Speculating on Hemispheres 40th anniv


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#41 AnalogKid

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 03:50 PM

When did Neil dismiss pre-Moving Pictures stuff? Do you recall?

It was in interviews and I think even one of his blog posts. I've been googling, but can't find it. He essentially says he wishes Moving Pictures was the first Rush album and that the 70s albums were just their formative years as a band.



#42 fenderjazz

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 04:12 PM

It was in interviews and I think even one of his blog posts. I've been googling, but can't find it. He essentially says he wishes Moving Pictures was the first Rush album and that the 70s albums were just their formative years as a band.

 

I remember an interview where he said they were like looking at his childhood drawings on his parent's refrigerator now.



#43 baldiepete

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 05:50 PM

I found this which has the quote but unfortunately not the link to the original interview. I’d consider this proof that he has no idea of the band’s appeal. I’d they hadn’t made those early albums they’d never have been in a position to make Moving Pictures and there wouldn’t have been an audience for it if they had.

http://www.progarchi...s.asp?TID=97299

Those were the growing years. I often equate that to children's drawings on the refrigerator that hang around too long, you know?

I really wish they would just go away. I think we really started....wow, given my druthers, I would make our first album "Moving Pictures." I can't think of a single reason not to do that!



#44 The Enemy Within

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 05:52 PM

His lyrics were always very much informed by whatever his current taste in literature was at the time. I've always assumed his dismissal of anything prior to Moving Pictures, was directed more at the lyrical influences, rather than the music as a whole. He was probably a little embarrassed at having worn his passion for Tolkein/Rand and Sci-Fi and Fantasy in general, so proudly on his sleeve throughout the 70's.



#45 AnalogKid

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 06:12 PM

His lyrics were always very much informed by whatever his current taste in literature was at the time. I've always assumed his dismissal of anything prior to Moving Pictures, was directed more at the lyrical influences, rather than the music as a whole. He was probably a little embarrassed at having worn his passion for Tolkein/Rand and Sci-Fi and Fantasy in general, so proudly on his sleeve throughout the 70's.

 

No question. He took on lyric duties and pulled from what inspired him at the time - all those books of fiction and fantasy he was reading. Still, musically, they were really pushing themselves and I'm surprised he isn't, at the very least, impressed with their playing. His drumming on Cygnus Book 1, 2, and La Villa is some of his finest.



#46 AnalogKid

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 06:51 PM

I found this which has the quote but unfortunately not the link to the original interview. I’d consider this proof that he has no idea of the band’s appeal. I’d they hadn’t made those early albums they’d never have been in a position to make Moving Pictures and there wouldn’t have been an audience for it if they had.

http://www.progarchi...s.asp?TID=97299
 

 

I poked around and couldn't find an actual source, just the text you quoted in a few forums - many people were questioning its authenticity since no source can be found. I do remember it being in an interview though, but I don't remember the context or his demeanor - was he joking around, angry, or just being brutally honest.



#47 chemistry1973

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 10:30 PM

I remember it too. He said MP was when Rush finally sounded like “Rush”.

It may have been from that Classic Albums show...

#48 jeffro

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 01:35 AM

I found this (beginning around 18:07) He's not dismissive of pre-MP Rush work but he says he wishes that MP was their first album

https://www.youtube...._mKr28G7og&t=7s


Pure fat, topped with a layer of fat - Alex Lifeson
 
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#49 AnalogKid

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 01:42 AM

I found this (beginning around 18:07) He's not dismissive of pre-MP Rush work but he says he wishes that MP was their first album

https://www.youtube...._mKr28G7og&t=7s

Nicely done! I was thinking of checking that interview, but wasn't sure. Yes, you can tell, lyrically, it was about poetic history and complicated technique. At least he acknowledges it.



#50 Slim

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 09:42 PM

I found this (beginning around 18:07) He's not dismissive of pre-MP Rush work but he says he wishes that MP was their first album

https://www.youtube...._mKr28G7og&t=7s

 

What I find more conspicuously surprising than that he (and perhaps the other two) don't realise how strong the early material is, is that they don't realise how very bad the later albums are, from HYF onwards.

 

And yet I must except Clockwork Angels from this rule. For with the dying gasp of their powers, the three men of Rush reached for glory - and glory did not elude their grasp.



#51 chemistry1973

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 10:19 PM

True.

Anthem
Fly By Night
Lamneth
Lakeside Park
Lessons


You could argue they’re better written than their best efforts from 94 on —-.

#52 jeffro

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 01:23 PM

What I find more conspicuously surprising than that he (and perhaps the other two) don't realise how strong the early material is, is that they don't realise how very bad the later albums are, from HYF onwards.

 

And yet I must except Clockwork Angels from this rule. For with the dying gasp of their powers, the three men of Rush reached for glory - and glory did not elude their grasp.

 

Generally I agree but for me it's not Hold Your Fire, it's Roll The Bones that starts the decline. Counterparts tries to rebound and does to a degree. Test For Echo has some good songs but some bleh songs and overall seems weak.

I've often wondered what Rush would have been if Neil's personal tragedies not happened. I think that event, and Geddy's solo album, had a big effect on Rush's sound. I think Geddy brought some "My Favorite Headache" sound into Vapor Trails and Snakes & Arrows to a lesser degree and I don't mean that in a positive way. I don't mind MFH but I certainly don't want Rush to sound that way. Clockwork Angels is clearly better than the preceding few albums.

 

Geddy and Alex seem to have more of an appreciation of the older material than Neil does but knowing Neil's personality, it's not surprising that he feels the way he does about the old stuff


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#53 chemistry1973

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 03:24 PM

From Vapor Trails on it seems to me they started laying down separate parts and digitally cobbling together songs in that fashion. It didn’t really work. Before that they’d rehearse the material as a band. Half of Vapor Trails, most of S/A — it’s glaringly apparent.

But yeah, you look at RtB and something was wrong with the formula they were using then too. Though I think that record suffered mostly from poor lyrics.

#54 chemistry1973

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 03:26 PM

I finally read Roadshow, and Peart mentions how he said No to touring Presto until the last minute. Maybe he was checked out for much of the 90s as far as writing lyrics went.

#55 timbale

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 05:41 PM

From Vapor Trails on it seems to me they started laying down separate parts and digitally cobbling together songs in that fashion. It didn’t really work. Before that they’d rehearse the material as a band. Half of Vapor Trails, most of S/A — it’s glaringly apparent.

But yeah, you look at RtB and something was wrong with the formula they were using then too. Though I think that record suffered mostly from poor lyrics.

 

Spot on.  This is also why a lot of the 2000's work sounds like the lyrics/vocals are just jammed on top of stuff randomly.  Because in a lot of cases, they are.


Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence.  


#56 jeffro

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 07:03 PM

From Vapor Trails on it seems to me they started laying down separate parts and digitally cobbling together songs in that fashion. It didn’t really work. Before that they’d rehearse the material as a band. Half of Vapor Trails, most of S/A — it’s glaringly apparent.

 

Except that for snakes & arrows they did get together to write. Not that I think it's one of their stronger efforts though. Some good songs but doesn't seem to stand the test of time. When it came out, I listened a few times and then back on the CD rack it went. I brought it out again several years later and had a new appreciation for it but quickly got bored again.  


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#57 Slim

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 12:50 PM

Spot on.  This is also why a lot of the 2000's work sounds like the lyrics/vocals are just jammed on top of stuff randomly.  Because in a lot of cases, they are.

 

Yes, this is my number one Rush Pet Hate. There comes a point - I think Counterparts was the tipping point actually - when the vocal melody, if I can even call it that - just doesn't feel like an integral part of the song. He seems to sort of atonally busk the words over the tune; the vocal doesn't have shape, or melody or form.



#58 chemistry1973

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 03:18 PM

Yes, this is my number one Rush Pet Hate. There comes a point - I think Counterparts was the tipping point actually - when the vocal melody, if I can even call it that - just doesn't feel like an integral part of the song. He seems to sort of atonally busk the words over the tune; the vocal doesn't have shape, or melody or form.


The bridge to Animate comes to mind.

#59 Three Eyes

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 12:17 AM

I believe starting with GUP, they began simplifying the arrangements under Geddy's vocals. I think Geddy is better at forming melodies when there's something underneath that makes him work for it. I just had the notion that you could probably take the lyrics of too many post-Signals songs and replace them with those of other post-Signals songs and not have a great deal of effort making them fit rhythmically.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#60 chemistry1973

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 06:23 PM

Except that for snakes & arrows they did get together to write. Not that I think it's one of their stronger efforts though. Some good songs but doesn't seem to stand the test of time. When it came out, I listened a few times and then back on the CD rack it went. I brought it out again several years later and had a new appreciation for it but quickly got bored again.

Well they got together to record the record- but I dont think the songs were created by weeks of working them out in rehearsals and soundchecks, while trying them out on the road before recording.

Far Cry is good. Don’t get me wrong there. Most the record is overproduced and mediocre.




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