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American Gods

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#1 Nunavuter

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 01:06 AM

Neil Gaiman's "American Gods" is certainly an excellent cable TV show. But I have to say reading the novel takes that enjoyment to a higher level. 

One of the issues you have as a viewer of the TV show is just how the gods are real in the universe Gaiman creates. There is a logic to the magic he employs.

This is clearer in the novel. Without spoiling anything, I can point out that the gods derive their magic powers from the humans who believe in them. Old gods become weaker over time. Some even become totally forgotten. This is death for a god.
 

In the TV show, a prehistoric people forget their elephant god as they migrate from Asia into North America. The old Asian elephant god thus dies. The new Bison god of the migrating inhabitants of North America rises in his place. The gods in Gaiman's universe derive their power from human belief. This is how the ancient Greek god of Vulcan is able to re-purpose his cult in a small, weird town in the US Midwest. (I'm purposely leaving out how Vulcan gets his worship in the 21st Century.)

Ostara (Esther, Easter) is chastised by Wednesday when he visits her amongst the rabbits and the many versions of Jesus who occupy her great mansion. Ostara, like Vulcan, has harnessed a new cult following. Wednesday does not approve. 

 


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#2 Three Eyes

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 01:14 AM

You know this isn't Facebook, right?


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#3 Nunavuter

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 01:19 AM

You know this isn't Facebook, right?

Is the Space Pope reptilian?


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#4 Three Eyes

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 01:35 AM

Is the Space Pope reptilian?

 

Indeed.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#5 Three Eyes

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 01:36 AM

I just gave you your first like, newbie.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#6 A Rebel and a Runner

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 05:32 AM

Neil Gaiman's "American Gods" is certainly an excellent cable TV show. But I have to say reading the novel takes that enjoyment to a higher level. 

One of the issues you have as a viewer of the TV show is just how the gods are real in the universe Gaiman creates. There is a logic to the magic he employs.

This is clearer in the novel. Without spoiling anything, I can point out that the gods derive their magic powers from the humans who believe in them. Old gods become weaker over time. Some even become totally forgotten. This is death for a god.
 

In the TV show, a prehistoric people forget their elephant god as they migrate from Asia into North America. The old Asian elephant god thus dies. The new Bison god of the migrating inhabitants of North America rises in his place. The gods in Gaiman's universe derive their power from human belief. This is how the ancient Greek god of Vulcan is able to re-purpose his cult in a small, weird town in the US Midwest. (I'm purposely leaving out how Vulcan gets his worship in the 21st Century.)

Ostara (Esther, Easter) is chastised by Wednesday when he visits her amongst the rabbits and the many versions of Jesus who occupy her great mansion. Ostara, like Vulcan, has harnessed a new cult following. Wednesday does not approve. 

 

Good to see you around, and talking about some Neil Gaiman work.  American Gods is spectacular and I became a Gaiman fan for life upon first reading it. 

 

Truth be told, I probably like his comic book writing more, however.  Especially what he did on Sandman for Vertigo.  It also deals with a god (Morpheus, the lord of Dreams) and his siblings (Death, Destiny, Despair, Desire, Destruction, Delirium), and their place within the world.  A few of them even die over the course of the story.  And Gaiman's interpretation of Death, as the person who puts up all the chairs and locks up the universe after everyone else has gone away, is probably my favorite.  She is Death the long-awaited friend, and is certainly more likable than her petty, angry protagonist of a brother.  Lucifer (yes, that one) is also quite compelling in that story when he shows up (and eventually spins off into a spectacular comic by Mike Carey).


labente deinde paulatim disciplina velut desidentes primo mores sequatur animo, deinde ut magis magisque lapsi sint, tum ire coeperint praecipites, donec ad haec tempora quibus nec vitia nostra nec remedia pati possumus perventum est.

 

First our declining morals slid, bit by bit, and then our very national spirit.  Then the collapse became greater and greater, and our principles began to go, until at last, it has come to this age, in which we can bear neither our crimes nor the cure for them.

 
 

#7 MrSkeptic

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 06:16 AM

I just gave you your first like, newbie.

Fanboie.


They said I could be anything, so I became a disappointment.

 

 


#8 Moving Target

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 07:37 AM

I thought the novel was meh, Gaiman did all this stuff far better in The Sandman.



#9 The Enemy Within

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 12:34 AM

Old Gaiman Good...






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