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#1 Wandering Hermit

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 12:51 AM

British band with some serious proggy chops. Worth a listen, Rushians. Singer has a high voice; not sure what to think of that...

 


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Those who know what's best for us...


#2 chemistry1973

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 01:04 AM

Lots of Crimson in that band.

#3 Greg

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 03:59 AM

I hear some Riverside in there, too.  Nice.  



#4 Moving Target

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 06:15 AM

The singers is ok. But drummers who don't groove annoy me, I end up fighting them. Stop sticking random beats in, just play 4/4 or 5/8 or something.

#5 Three Eyes

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 08:10 AM

^^^ Maybe you'll like this.

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#6 Three Eyes

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 08:20 AM


Djent

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Djent

Stylistic origins



Cultural origins

Mid-1990s in Sweden

Typical instruments



Fusion genres

Progressive metalcore

Regional scenes

  • Australia

  • Brazil

  • Europe

  • United States



Other topics


Djent /ˈɛnt/ is a style of progressive metal,[1][2] named for an onomatopoeia for the distinctive high-gain, distorted, palm-muted, low-pitch guitar sound first employed by Meshuggah and Sikth. Typically, the word is used to refer to music that makes use of this sound, to the sound itself, or to the scene that revolves around it.[3]




Contents

Development

Fredrik Thordendal, the guitarist of Swedish band Meshuggah, is considered the originator of the djent technique.[3] However, the band did not coin the term itself; the djent scene developed from an online community of bedroom musicians, including Misha Mansoor, whose success with Periphery brought djent "from the virtual world into the real one."[3] Other bands important in the development of the style are SikTh, Mnemic, Animals as Leaders,[2]TesseracT,[4][5][6] and Textures.[7]

The scene has grown rapidly,[8] and members of the original online community, including the bands Chimp Spanner, Gizmachi, and Monuments, have gone on to tour and release albums commercially.[3][9] Other bands that are often considered djent include A Life Once Lost,[10]Veil of Maya,[11]Vildhjarta,[12] and Xerath.[13]Born of Osiris have also been described as being inspired by the djent movement.[8] Furthermore, Hacktivist[14][15] and DVSR[16] are djent bands that use rapping as primary vocal style


Characteristics

Djent as a style is characterized by progressive, rhythmic, and technical complexity.[6] It typically features heavily distorted, palm-muted guitar chords, syncopated riffs,[3] and polymeters alongside virtuoso soloing.[1] Another common feature is the use of extended range seven-string, eight-string, and nine-string guitars.[17]


Reception

Some members of the metal community have criticized the term "djent", either treating it as a short-lived fad, openly condemning it, or questioning its validity as a genre. But other bands such as TesseracT and Animals as Leaders have gained positive reviews, such as awards and highly-acclaimed albums. Post-metal band Rosetta is noted as saying, "Maybe we should start calling doom metal 'DUNNN'."[18] In response to a question about 'djent', Lamb of God vocalist Randy Blythe stated, "There is no such thing as 'djent'; it's not a genre."[19] In an interview with Guitar Messenger, Periphery guitarist Misha Mansoor said:

I was looking for gear that was djenty. I was like: ‘Are these pickups djenty?’ For some reason it caught on, but completely in the wrong way, because people think it's a style of music and they think it's a style of music I play.[20]

In a later interview with Freethinkers Blog, Misha Mansoor stated that he felt djent had become "this big umbrella term for any sort of progressive band, and also any band that will [use] off-time chugs [...] You also get bands like Scale the Summit [who are referred to as] a djent band [when] 80% of their stuff sounds like clean channel, and it's all beautiful and pretty, you know [...] In that way, I think it's cool because it groups really cool bands together [...] We are surrounded by a lot of bands that I respect, but at the same time, I don't think people know what djent is either [...] It's very unclear." Later in the interview, he stated, "If you call us djent, that's fine. I mean, I would never self-apply the term, but at the same time, it's just so vague that I don't know what to make of it."[21]

Tosin Abasi of Animals as Leaders also takes a more lenient view of the term, stating that there are specific characteristics that are common to "djent" bands, therefore implying legitimate use of the term as a genre. While stating that he personally strives not to subscribe exclusively to any one genre, he makes the point that a genre is defined by the ability to associate common features between different artists. In this way, it is possible to view djent as a genre describing a particular niche of modern, progressive metal.[22]


List of artists
This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries.

Band

Country of origin

Active

References

A Life Once Lost

U.S.

1999–2013

 

After the Burial

U.S.

2004–present

 

The Afterimage

Canada

2012–present

 

The Algorithm

France

2009–present

 

Animals as Leaders

U.S.

2007–present

[2]

Architects

U.K.

2004–present

 

Artefacts

Malaysia

2012–present

 

Born of Osiris

U.S.

2003–present

 

Chimp Spanner

U.K.

2004–present

 

Coilbox

Spain

1999–2006, 2011–present

 

The Contortionist

U.S.

2007–present

[23]

Despite

Sweden

1998–present

 

Destrage

Italy

2005–present

 

DVSR

Australia

2013–present

 

Elitist

U.S.

2010–2015

 

Erra

U.S.

2009–present

 

Fellsilent

U.K.

2003-2010

 

Forevermore

U.S.

2009–present

 

Glass Cloud

U.S.

2011–present

 

Hacktivist

U.K.

2011–present

 

I, the Breather

U.S.

2009–2016

 

In Hearts Wake

Australia

2006–present

 

Intervals

Canada

2011–present

 

Invent, Animate

U.S.

2011–present

 

Meshuggah

Sweden

1987–present

 

Monuments

U.K.

2007–present

 

Northlane

Australia

2009–present

 

Omega Diatribe

Hungary

2012–present

 

Paul Ortiz

U.K.

2004–present

 

Periphery

U.S.

2005–present

[2][3]

Plini

Australia

2012–present

 

Polyphia

U.S.

2010–present

 

Reflections

U.S.

2010–present

 

Returning We Hear the Larks

U.K.

2008–2015

 

SikTh

U.K

1999–present

 

Sirens

U.S.

2011–present

 

TesseracT

U.K.

2007–present

[2][4][5][6]

Textures

Netherlands

2001–2017

[7]

The Tony Danza Tapdance Extravaganza

U.S.

2004–2012

 

Twelve Foot Ninja

Australia

2008–present

 

Uneven Structure

France

2008–present

 

Veil of Maya

U.S.

2004–present

 

Vildhjarta

Sweden

2005–present

 

Volumes

U.S.

2009–present

Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.





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