Jump to content


Photo

No, GM crops aren't drenched in chemicals


  • Please log in to reply
49 replies to this topic

#1 SJS

SJS

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • LocationJust east of Lyra

Posted 29 March 2016 - 02:51 PM

I'm a fan of Farm Babe on facebook.  It is great to hear a farmer's perspective on GM technology, since I come at the issue more from a biotech background.

 

Source

 

Sadly, the site won't let me copy/paste.

No, GM crops aren’t drenched in chemicals. By Farm Babe | December 12, 2015 | Category Anti-GMO Farm Babe Cornfield No, GM crops aren’t drenched in chemicals. This is a guest blog, originally posted by friend of the page, Michelle Miller. You may know Michelle better as Farm Babe! This article is being posted on aSE at Michelle’s request. I took this picture of the weeds at the edge of our cornfield back in August. Could you imagine what would happen if Farmers didn’t have the ability to control weeds in our fields? They say if we didn’t have access to herbicides, we would need an area of cropland the size of Texas to make up for lost yields due to weeds. Farm Babe Cornfield Does that thought… The thought of crops being sprayed… Scare you at all? It shouldn’t! Farmers have used chemicals on crops for thousands of years, and even organic farms have access to different types of approved chemicals to help us combat the annoyances that we are sometimes faced with when mother nature is our boss. Herbicides are not insectides Each individual herbicide (also known as a “mode of action”) targets a certain enzyme in plants and does not affect animals or humans. (They’re HERBicides. Insecticides target insects.) A common herbicide example is roundup, which inhibits the EPSPS enzyme. Over 90% of farmers have been growing “roundup ready” corn for a couple decades now. The beauty of this is that it allows us to spray our fields to kill weeds, but it does not kill our crop. Technology has come a long way for us on this. Back in the day, Farmers had to apply substantially MORE chemicals that were far worse to battle all the different weeds. Several decades ago, it was not uncommon to have to apply around 8 different chemicals, including insecticides, to get to job done. Now it’s only 1 or 2… No more harmful insecticides either! (This is a general statement and may vary by region.) Today’s methods are much safer and a much smaller dose. Technology has improved virtually every industry in our lives, and agriculture is no exception. The dose makes the poison Let’s talk about that dose, shall we? Did you know that the amount of Roundup that gets sprayed on a field equates to about a fifth of a gallon combined with a hundred parts water per acre? That’s less than 2 beer cans worth over an area of land the size of a football field! And… The active ingredient of the product makes the dosage even less! To top it all off, these crops get sprayed in the vegetative stage, before the edible part of the plant is even present… But even if it WERE present, they’re still protected by husks. (Or pods, shells, etc for other crops.) Corn gets planted around 30,000-40,000 seeds per acre. Around fall harvest, after the plant matures, one acre will yield (on average) nearly 12,000 POUNDS of corn. Does 2 soda cans worth of herbicide misted over 12,000 POUNDS of grain…. Protected by husks… Sprayed before the edible part of the plant is even present… Sound scary now? Didn’t think so. Unfortunately, for all the good information we can find on the internet, we can also be faced with BS, or someone trying to sell you something…like organic foods. But its important to think critically. Every industry is trying to capitalize on something, whether it’s medical, fitness or beauty trends, etc. But its important to talk to industry professionals who devote their entire lives and careers to this, and not something written by a Hollywood celebrity or journalist. Thanks for your time and support in reading this. If you have any questions about something related to agriculture, ask a farmer! We may be hard to find in a downtown area of a big city, but if you seek us out, we are generally a very kind breed who want to connect with you. I hope this helps address any concerns. Michelle Miller, or Farm Babe, grew up involved in 4-H, horse riding and doing chores on her friends’ grandparents farms, but when her high school aptitude tests told her to go into farming, she ignored them and headed west for college and a career in fashion. After working for Gucci On Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills and spending a number of years in downtown Chicago, she bought into organic, grass-fed, “Monsanto is the devil” food idealism. At this point she caught the travel bug and moved to Florida, where she was able to have a flexible schedule as a ‘globetrotting bartender’ to finish up her goal of visiting all 7 continents, (56 countries.) she then met her “Prince Farming.” In the years she has been living and working on his Iowa farm, she has learned the truths of modern agriculture firsthand and enjoys educating the public and debunking the popular myths she once believed in. Together, he works alongside him and his family on nearly 2,000 acres of corn, soybeans, alfalfa, oats, sheep, and cattle. She’s happier than she’s ever been to get back to her “roots” of being involved with animals and farming and shas gone from being skeptical about food to to sharing her passion of modern agriculture! She’s literally gone from Rodeo to the Rodeo, and wouldn’t have it any other way. This is a guest blog, originally posted on Farm Babe, and is being posted on aSE by Farm Babe’s request. You can reply to the post on Facebook.

Read more at: http://ascienceenthu...d-in-chemicals/
No, GM crops aren’t drenched in chemicals. By Farm Babe | December 12, 2015 | Category Anti-GMO Farm Babe Cornfield No, GM crops aren’t drenched in chemicals. This is a guest blog, originally posted by friend of the page, Michelle Miller. You may know Michelle better as Farm Babe! This article is being posted on aSE at Michelle’s request. I took this picture of the weeds at the edge of our cornfield back in August. Could you imagine what would happen if Farmers didn’t have the ability to control weeds in our fields? They say if we didn’t have access to herbicides, we would need an area of cropland the size of Texas to make up for lost yields due to weeds. Farm Babe Cornfield Does that thought… The thought of crops being sprayed… Scare you at all? It shouldn’t! Farmers have used chemicals on crops for thousands of years, and even organic farms have access to different types of approved chemicals to help us combat the annoyances that we are sometimes faced with when mother nature is our boss. Herbicides are not insectides Each individual herbicide (also known as a “mode of action”) targets a certain enzyme in plants and does not affect animals or humans. (They’re HERBicides. Insecticides target insects.) A common herbicide example is roundup, which inhibits the EPSPS enzyme. Over 90% of farmers have been growing “roundup ready” corn for a couple decades now. The beauty of this is that it allows us to spray our fields to kill weeds, but it does not kill our crop. Technology has come a long way for us on this. Back in the day, Farmers had to apply substantially MORE chemicals that were far worse to battle all the different weeds. Several decades ago, it was not uncommon to have to apply around 8 different chemicals, including insecticides, to get to job done. Now it’s only 1 or 2… No more harmful insecticides either! (This is a general statement and may vary by region.) Today’s methods are much safer and a much smaller dose. Technology has improved virtually every industry in our lives, and agriculture is no exception. The dose makes the poison Let’s talk about that dose, shall we? Did you know that the amount of Roundup that gets sprayed on a field equates to about a fifth of a gallon combined with a hundred parts water per acre? That’s less than 2 beer cans worth over an area of land the size of a football field! And… The active ingredient of the product makes the dosage even less! To top it all off, these crops get sprayed in the vegetative stage, before the edible part of the plant is even present… But even if it WERE present, they’re still protected by husks. (Or pods, shells, etc for other crops.) Corn gets planted around 30,000-40,000 seeds per acre. Around fall harvest, after the plant matures, one acre will yield (on average) nearly 12,000 POUNDS of corn. Does 2 soda cans worth of herbicide misted over 12,000 POUNDS of grain…. Protected by husks… Sprayed before the edible part of the plant is even present… Sound scary now? Didn’t think so. Unfortunately, for all the good information we can find on the internet, we can also be faced with BS, or someone trying to sell you something…like organic foods. But its important to think critically. Every industry is trying to capitalize on something, whether it’s medical, fitness or beauty trends, etc. But its important to talk to industry professionals who devote their entire lives and careers to this, and not something written by a Hollywood celebrity or journalist. Thanks for your time and support in reading this. If you have any questions about something related to agriculture, ask a farmer! We may be hard to find in a downtown area of a big city, but if you seek us out, we are generally a very kind breed who want to connect with you. I hope this helps address any concerns. Michelle Miller, or Farm Babe, grew up involved in 4-H, horse riding and doing chores on her friends’ grandparents farms, but when her high school aptitude tests told her to go into farming, she ignored them and headed west for college and a career in fashion. After working for Gucci On Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills and spending a number of years in downtown Chicago, she bought into organic, grass-fed, “Monsanto is the devil” food idealism. At this point she caught the travel bug and moved to Florida, where she was able to have a flexible schedule as a ‘globetrotting bartender’ to finish up her goal of visiting all 7 continents, (56 countries.) she then met her “Prince Farming.” In the years she has been living and working on his Iowa farm, she has learned the truths of modern agriculture firsthand and enjoys educating the public and debunking the popular myths she once believed in. Together, he works alongside him and his family on nearly 2,000 acres of corn, soybeans, alfalfa, oats, sheep, and cattle. She’s happier than she’s ever been to get back to her “roots” of being involved with animals and farming and shas gone from being skeptical about food to to sharing her passion of modern agriculture! She’s literally gone from Rodeo to the Rodeo, and wouldn’t have it any other way. This is a guest blog, originally posted on Farm Babe, and is being posted on aSE by Farm Babe’s request. You can reply to the post on Facebook.

Read more at: http://ascienceenthu...d-in-chemicals/
o, GM crops aren’t drenched in chemicals. By Far

Read more at: http://ascienceenthu...d-in-chemicals/

LYqbjSn.jpg


#2 Slim

Slim

    Advanced Member

  • Hat Award Winner
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,223 posts

Posted 01 April 2016 - 06:59 PM

They are, actually. Regularly.



#3 SJS

SJS

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • LocationJust east of Lyra

Posted 01 April 2016 - 07:44 PM

I can't tell if you're being ironic.  If you mean that everything is chemicals, such as the water the herbicide is diluted in, then that's a rather clever retort.

 

If, on the other hand, you are missing the author's point, shame on you.


  • A Rebel and a Runner likes this

LYqbjSn.jpg


#4 Greg

Greg

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,322 posts
  • LocationAustin, TX

Posted 01 April 2016 - 08:41 PM

I want to read this, I really do.  But those monstrous paragraphs aren't making it easy.  :)



#5 MrSkeptic

MrSkeptic

    Advanced Member

  • Hat Award Winner
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,284 posts
  • LocationNorthwesterly

Posted 01 April 2016 - 08:54 PM

Seems the Farm Babe is much, much smarter than the Food Babe.


They said I could be anything, so I became a disappointment.

 

 


#6 SJS

SJS

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • LocationJust east of Lyra

Posted 02 April 2016 - 01:26 AM

I want to read this, I really do.  But those monstrous paragraphs aren't making it easy.  :)


Lol.

Click the link for better formatting!

LYqbjSn.jpg


#7 Slim

Slim

    Advanced Member

  • Hat Award Winner
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,223 posts

Posted 02 April 2016 - 09:13 AM

I can't tell if you're being ironic.  If you mean that everything is chemicals, such as the water the herbicide is diluted in, then that's a rather clever retort.

 

Thanks! I was thinking of this one in particular.



#8 SJS

SJS

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • LocationJust east of Lyra

Posted 02 April 2016 - 11:27 PM

Thanks! I was thinking of this one in particular.

 

Bravo, then!


LYqbjSn.jpg


#9 Xanadu590

Xanadu590

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 844 posts

Posted 02 April 2016 - 11:40 PM

Bravo, then!


should've called it dihydrogen monoxide, though

sounds way more menacing that way


for more information please reread

#10 scott14

scott14

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 600 posts
  • LocationNYC

Posted 03 April 2016 - 05:11 PM

I think my issue with GM crops is that with changing nature, and our food sources, at the fast rate which it's been done, we have no idea as to what the long term outcome is going to be.  The increase in food allergies, the dying off of large populations of bees, and of course the clandestine nature of all the lobbying, legislation, and resistance to labeling behind the GMO movement are all potential red flags.  I also read that Monsanto's Roundup (not even mentioning their industrial level stuff) is terrible for us and the environment...  I'm not convinced.

 

So on that note, I am seeding my garden this year with nothing but non-GMO, certified organic, heirloom seeds.  Fertilizing with nothing but natural, non-chemical organic fertilizer and self-generated household compost.  And the raised beds are filled with nothing but organic soil and composted manure.  


  • DarthLen and fast eddie like this

#11 RushDoggie

RushDoggie

    Advanced Member

  • Hat Award Winner
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,159 posts

Posted 03 April 2016 - 06:19 PM

I think my issue with GM crops is that with changing nature, and our food sources, at the fast rate which it's been done, we have no idea as to what the long term outcome is going to be.

 

How many years of GMOs would convince you we know what the long term outcome will be?


  • A Rebel and a Runner likes this

“Music is probably the only real magic I have encountered in my life. It's pure and it's real. It moves, it heals.” - Tom Petty

 

 


#12 RushDoggie

RushDoggie

    Advanced Member

  • Hat Award Winner
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,159 posts

Posted 03 April 2016 - 06:22 PM

 I also read that Monsanto's Roundup (not even mentioning their industrial level stuff) is terrible for us and the environment...  I'm not convinced.

 

Reviews on the safety of glyphosate and Roundup herbicide that have been conducted by several regulatory agencies and scientific institutions worldwide have concluded that there is no indication of any human health concern. Nevertheless, questions regarding their safety are periodically raised. This review was undertaken to produce a current and comprehensive safety evaluation and risk assessment for humans. It includes assessments of glyphosate, its major breakdown product [aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA)], its Roundup formulations, and the predominant surfactant [polyethoxylated tallow amine (POEA)] used in Roundup formulations worldwide. The studies evaluated in this review included those performed for regulatory purposes as well as published research reports. The oral absorption of glyphosate and AMPA is low, and both materials are eliminated essentially unmetabolized. Dermal penetration studies with Roundup showed very low absorption. Experimental evidence has shown that neither glyphosate nor AMPA bioaccumulates in any animal tissue. No significant toxicity occurred in acute, subchronic, and chronic studies. Direct ocular exposure to the concentrated Roundup formulation can result in transient irritation, while normal spray dilutions cause, at most, only minimal effects. The genotoxicity data for glyphosate and Roundup were assessed using a weight-of-evidence approach and standard evaluation criteria. There was no convincing evidence for direct DNA damage in vitro or in vivo, and it was concluded that Roundup and its components do not pose a risk for the production of heritable/somatic mutations in humans. Multiple lifetime feeding studies have failed to demonstrate any tumorigenic potential for glyphosate. Accordingly, it was concluded that glyphosate is noncarcinogenic. Glyphosate, AMPA, and POEA were not teratogenic or developmentally toxic. There were no effects on fertility or reproductive parameters in two multigeneration reproduction studies with glyphosate. Likewise there were no adverse effects in reproductive tissues from animals treated with glyphosate, AMPA, or POEA in chronic and/or subchronic studies. Results from standard studies with these materials also failed to show any effects indicative of endocrine modulation. Therefore, it is concluded that the use of Roundup herbicide does not result in adverse effects on development, reproduction, or endocrine systems in humans and other mammals. For purposes of risk assessment, no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) were identified for all subchronic, chronic, developmental, and reproduction studies with glyphosate, AMPA, and POEA. Margins-of-exposure for chronic risk were calculated for each compound by dividing the lowest applicable NOAEL by worst-case estimates of chronic exposure. Acute risks were assessed by comparison of oral LD50 values to estimated maximum acute human exposure. It was concluded that, under present and expected conditions of use, Roundup herbicide does not pose a health risk to humans.

 

http://www.sciencedi...273230099913715


“Music is probably the only real magic I have encountered in my life. It's pure and it's real. It moves, it heals.” - Tom Petty

 

 


#13 scott14

scott14

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 600 posts
  • LocationNYC

Posted 03 April 2016 - 07:21 PM

It was concluded that, under present and expected conditions of use, Roundup herbicide does not pose a health risk to humans.

That's what they want you to believe...   


  • fast eddie likes this

#14 RushDoggie

RushDoggie

    Advanced Member

  • Hat Award Winner
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,159 posts

Posted 03 April 2016 - 07:24 PM

That's what they want you to believe...   

 

:P


  • scott14 likes this

“Music is probably the only real magic I have encountered in my life. It's pure and it's real. It moves, it heals.” - Tom Petty

 

 


#15 SJS

SJS

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • LocationJust east of Lyra

Posted 03 April 2016 - 07:52 PM

Love ya Rush Doggie. 


LYqbjSn.jpg


#16 Slim

Slim

    Advanced Member

  • Hat Award Winner
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,223 posts

Posted 03 April 2016 - 08:18 PM

 Roundup herbicide does not pose a health risk to humans.

 

Interesting, because I thought it was a brand name of 'paraquat' - which is absolutely lethal stuff. But I never garden.



#17 Always the Winner

Always the Winner

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,996 posts

Posted 04 April 2016 - 12:18 AM

I've been using a product called Temprid to spray foundations so far this year. Last week my boss called in a panic because the Black Widow at the state Dept of Ag is focusing on that to study if that's affecting the bee populations in Mass. So now I've switched to Termidor. It's only labeled for 1 foot up and out from foundations, whereas Temprid can go up to 3 feet.

Hey...where's Perry?


#18 grep

grep

    Advanced Member

  • Hat Award Winner
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,589 posts
  • LocationNYC USA

Posted 04 April 2016 - 01:05 AM

Well, I figure poison is poison, so when I'm killing weeds with Roundup the rubber gloves go on. It's great at what it does, though so was Agent Orange, eh?

Rogue-One-Death-Star-Installment.jpg

 

May The Force Be With Us...

 


#19 SJS

SJS

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • LocationJust east of Lyra

Posted 04 April 2016 - 02:01 AM

Well, I figure poison is poison, so when I'm killing weeds with Roundup the rubber gloves go on. It's great at what it does, though so was Agent Orange, eh?

 

But poison isn't poison. 

 

Chocolate is poison to dogs.  It's not to people.

 

Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, it poisonous to weeds.  It's not to people.

 

Bt toxin, the insecticide in some GMO crops, is poisonous to some insect larvae.  It's not to people.


  • RushDoggie and A Rebel and a Runner like this

LYqbjSn.jpg


#20 Always the Winner

Always the Winner

    Advanced Member

  • Peeps*
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,996 posts

Posted 04 April 2016 - 02:12 AM

I've been using a product called Temprid to spray foundations so far this year. Last week my boss called in a panic because the Black Widow at the state Dept of Ag is focusing on that to study if that's affecting the bee populations in Mass. So now I've switched to Termidor. It's only labeled for 1 foot up and out from foundations, whereas Temprid can go up to 3 feet.

Hey...where's Perry?





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users