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#1 Hemisfears

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 02:36 PM

Memo to Millennials: Corporate America doesn’t want to have a “dialogue” about your “concerns.” Being an employee is not like being a college student. Your boss isn’t there to give you a cuddle and establish a committee to change his ways for you.

Your employers can and will fire you for making them look bad. This is as it must be.

A 25-year-old San Francisco Yelp employee named Talia Jane didn’t like the salary she was offered at the groovy tech company Yelp. So did she decline the job offer and take her skill set to a higher bidder? No, she accepted the gig, then publicly whined about her salary. In an open letterTo her CEO. Whom she called out by name.

Yelp fired her within two hours, which tells you that even companies with cute names protect their interests as ruthlessly as your average ill-tempered Gila monster.

Jane said she was getting 12 bucks an hour, which isn’t enough to eat. “I haven’t bought groceries since I started this job,” she said, having been living on one bag of rice. She spends 80 percent of her wages on rent, which is $1,245 a month. (She apparently has no roommate.) Also, she has a home Internet connection, which no one in the world had until about 20 years ago, not to mention a car. But she’s considering getting rid of the former, which she bought with intent to pursue some freelancing gigs. Now she claims to be “too stressed” to do side work.

There’s a clue about the difference between actual suffering and the pretend kind known as “reality out of kilter with sense of entitlement.”

No one who is actually starving would turn down work. This is because working beats starving. Picture George Orwell’s miserable coal miners in “The Road to Wigan Pier.” Did any of them say, “Sorry, luv, can’t handle work today. Too stressed!”? Jane’s Instagram photos of her snacking habits (prosciutto, etc.) also undercut her starvation claims.

Guidelines for the starving: Instagram less; work more. Get a second job, Talia. Get a roommate. Get several. Get rid of your car. This is how everyone your age in New York has been living for generations.

Throughout the 2,000-word piece, Talia sounds the classic Millennial whine: Why isn’t the world helping me more? (Though the world does more for her than it does for most: She set up a GoFundMe account that has brought in over $1,800.) Talia’s problems have nothing to do with Yelp and everything to do with Talia.

“I left college, having majored in English literature, with a dream to work in media,” Talia wrote.

Gosh, three mistakes in a row, there, Talia! You obviously should never have left campus if you’re determined to be treated forever like a delicate little bunny in a padded cage, with someone coming to change the pellets in your feeding bowl.

Majoring in English? I’ve been there. Got turned down for my first credit card. By Citibank, which sent me a rejection letter citing my “field of study.” I reapplied, changing my entry for “major” to “business.” Which not only wasn’t my field but wasn’t even a field of study offered by my school. But it worked, providing a valuable educational experience: an impromptu seminar in the value of bullshit.

Next lifetime, Talia, try majoring in petroleum engineering or supply-chain management. These fields teach what are known as “skills” (=demand, =$$$). Having a take on Joan Didion is more of what you might call a “hobby” (=love, =unpaid).

“And a dream to work in media.” Talia, everyone wants to work in media. Unfortunately for you, that includes those of us who are already working in media. We aren’t giving up our spots. You know why? Working in the media is super fun! We do stuff the normals only wish they could do, plus we get paid for it!

Sure, Talia, you and your generation can replace us. You already are replacing us. There’s a kid standing next to my desk right now. He’s 23, he’s very nice, he went to Bowdoin, his name is Tyler. He’s pretending to check Yik Yak, but really he’s just waiting for 25 years of General Tso’s chicken to realize their destiny and seal up my arteries like the boulder rolling in front of the exit in “Raiders of the Lost Ark.” My seat will still be warm when he takes it.

Or so he hopes! Say my arteries continue to flow like the mighty Niagara and I don’t vacate my seat. Since you and Tyler don’t know anything, the main thing you have to offer employers is low price.

Tyler’s OK. He’s got a trust fund. Do you? If not, don’t become an actor. Don’t become a poet. Don’t become a conceptual performance artist. Don’t work in media. You can’t afford to follow your dreams if everyone’s idea of a “dream” involves being OK with being paid in coolness instead of dollars.

http://nypost.com/20...-salary-online/


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#2 Moving Target

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 02:48 PM

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#3 GhostWriter

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 03:26 PM

Must admit, I quite enjoyed that. And I can only imagine the student debt this snowflake piled up for her worthless degree. Being smart is no longer a requirement for university or the workplace it would appear; although the latter will be happy to splash people with the cold water of reality whereas the former keeps you from that reality.


It is true, that a little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.

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#4 Hemisfears

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 03:33 PM

TJ0504.jpg

And I thought you liked to eat rat's asshole.


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#5 fenderjazz

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 03:52 PM

Put me in the pro-millienial camp.  The conditions they are facing post-college are worse than many generations have faced.  Real unemployment, in the U.S. is ~20%.   They are fighting for unpaid internships.  My kid is doing that now.  When you have to compete for a job that is unpaid, what then about the paid jobs and the good paying jobs?

 

New industries have cropped up, including services like Yelp which manage a tiny income stream, have a product that is essentially "free" and make up for it with some advertising.  They expect a near "free" labor force to cope with their small revenue stream for their size.  Realistically companies like Yelp and Twitter, should not be in business.  Their existence is eventually doomed but they have a great idea, they just can't increase their revenue/profit very well.

 

Yelp is a resume-booster job.  It's a job you take, and now on your resume you've got a household name.  You leave that job, on good terms, after a year and now somebody else will hire you.  This gal did not see it as this, and she wasn't in a position in her life to have such a job like this one.  This is a job for someone post-grad, who is living with their parents.  She'd be well off in a couple of years.


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#6 Hemisfears

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 04:02 PM

 Real unemployment, in the U.S. is ~20%.   

Just wait for the massive economic meltdown that is on it's way. Not if, but when. This country is very close to going belly-up.

 

BTW, don't try to tell lefties that the unemployment numbers are that high....that makes King Hussein look bad because he has been trying to convince the nation of sheep that unemployment is only at 5%. 


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#7 fenderjazz

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 04:17 PM

Just wait for the massive economic meltdown that is on it's way. Not if, but when. This country is very close to going belly-up.

 

BTW, don't try to tell lefties that the unemployment numbers are that high....that makes King Hussein look bad because he has been trying to convince the nation of sheep that unemployment is only at 5%. 

 

They'll be whining about 20% once Trump is elected.

 

But don't denigrate this conversation by making it all about Obama.  The problem runs deeper than that.  Look at your life, on the internet, on your phone.  There is value there.  What are you paying for it?  Nothing I'm sure.


Facebook - Free

Twitter - Free

Yelp - Free

Youtube - Free

Counterparts - Free

 

The platforms that can sell adequate advertising are doing well - ie Facebook and Google.  The ones that don't such as Twitter or Yelp are not doing as well.  Our everything-for-free culture has also created an everything-for-free labor market.  This isn't a conservative or liberal problem, it's a problem where people have great ideas but poor business plans.  As millennials fall into the job market, they are trying their best to be independent of their parents and move towards supporting themselves, getting married, having kids, buying a home, you know, the American dream.  It's really delayed for them.  I had a full time job with benefits and was financially independent of my parents at 22, and married and owned property at 23.  I had kids at 27.  I can't see either of my kids getting to where I was at 22 until they are almost 30.

 

On the other hand, our generation raised a generation that feels they are "special"  Yes, we helped create this narcissism we complain about now and yes, we have to help them get over that, grow a pair, a thicker skin and get to working.  It's not easy.  In my role, I have a lot of millennials on my team.  I'm trying to get the rest of the company to take a chance on them too.  These kids have a lot to contribute, but they will need help.  We can't sit on our hands and have a generation of people who are hopelessly inadequate.  We all fail when that happens.


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#8 chemistry1973

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 04:37 PM

She's living in the the most expensive city in the US. I have friends that work in SF, make six figures, and can't live in the city.

Rent is about 3000/month on average for a one bedroom. That does not include parking, which is hundreds of dollars a month.

Then city taxes.

SF sucks.



#9 fenderjazz

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 04:42 PM

She's living in the he most expensive city in the US. I have friends that work in SF, make six figures, and can't live in the city.

Rent is about 3000/month on average for a one bedroom. That does not include parking, which is hundreds of dollars a month.

Then city taxes.

SF sucks.

 

Same as NYC but at least NYC has better mass transit.  I'd say that it's not only this gal who can't afford SF, rather it's Yelp that can't afford SF.  They should move too.



#10 Hemisfears

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 04:50 PM

They'll be whining about 20% once Trump is elected.

 

But don't denigrate this conversation by making it all about Obama.  The problem runs deeper than that.  Look at your life, on the internet, on your phone.  There is value there.  What are you paying for it?  Nothing I'm sure.


Facebook - Free

Twitter - Free

Yelp - Free

Youtube - Free

Counterparts - Free

 

The platforms that can sell adequate advertising are doing well - ie Facebook and Google.  The ones that don't such as Twitter or Yelp are not doing as well.  Our everything-for-free culture has also created an everything-for-free labor market.  This isn't a conservative or liberal problem, it's a problem where people have great ideas but poor business plans.  As millennials fall into the job market, they are trying their best to be independent of their parents and move towards supporting themselves, getting married, having kids, buying a home, you know, the American dream.  It's really delayed for them.  I had a full time job with benefits and was financially independent of my parents at 22, and married and owned property at 23.  I had kids at 27.  I can't see either of my kids getting to where I was at 22 until they are almost 30.

 

On the other hand, our generation raised a generation that feels they are "special"  Yes, we helped create this narcissism we complain about now and yes, we have to help them get over that, grow a pair, a thicker skin and get to working.  It's not easy.  In my role, I have a lot of millennials on my team.  I'm trying to get the rest of the company to take a chance on them too.  These kids have a lot to contribute, but they will need help.  We can't sit on our hands and have a generation of people who are hopelessly inadequate.  We all fail when that happens.

Maybe look at the salaries some of these "professors" earn while spewing out a bunch of leftist crap. Maybe the costs for school wouldn't be so obscene if some of these teachers  radical activists weren't on the payroll.


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#11 fenderjazz

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 05:00 PM

Maybe look at the salaries some of these "professors" earn while spewing out a bunch of leftist crap. Maybe the costs for school wouldn't be so obscene if some of these teachers  radical activists weren't on the payroll.

 

That's pretty much irrelevant.  Let's ignore the college tuition bubble and it's causes.  That doesn't impact millennial employability.  It impacts the need for millennial employability, but it's not the cause.  Professors get paid, sure.  It's a living.  Their political views are a different topic altogether.  Not every problem has the same cause.

 

in other words, let's not try and make every thread about your pet peeves mmkay?


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#12 GhostWriter

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 05:33 PM

On the other hand, our generation raised a generation that feels they are "special"  Yes, we helped create this narcissism we complain about now and yes, we have to help them get over that, grow a pair, a thicker skin and get to working.  It's not easy.  In my role, I have a lot of millennials on my team.  I'm trying to get the rest of the company to take a chance on them too.  These kids have a lot to contribute, but they will need help.  We can't sit on our hands and have a generation of people who are hopelessly inadequate.  We all fail when that happens.

 

I'm not so sure that helps them if we have to "help them get over it". There is a massive sense of entitlement amongst millennials and only a dose of real world reality will help them readjust their expectations; they need to fix it. There is no soft landing. Now granted, they have been lied to (Hemi's point that seems to be relevant in a roundabout way) that any degree is a golden ticket to live like the Kardashians. But there is an incredible number of poor choices being made that won't fix this any time soon.

 

And calling out your CEO publicly certainly ain't the way to do it.


It is true, that a little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.

- Francis Bacon

 


#13 Hemisfears

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 08:01 PM

in other words, let's not try and make your threads about your pet peeves mmkay?

:coffee spit monitor:


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#14 chemistry1973

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 08:18 PM

Trade work will never go away.  You can be a cog in the system, or learn a trade, which takes study, experience, and a shit ton of hard work.

 

EG ---If you're a competent plumber you will never be out of a job.


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#15 chemistry1973

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 08:23 PM

Millennials have been conditioned that if they go to the right schools, and take the right classes, that they'll be set up in a non-existent white-collar job.

 

There is so much work out there - you just have to go out and get it.


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#16 Hemisfears

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 08:56 PM

There is so much work out there - you just have to go out and get it.

 

Maybe not in retail......

 

https://www.yahoo.co...-140332584.html


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#17 Hemisfears

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 08:57 PM

oops...sorry, more right-wing paranoia there.... <_<


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#18 chemistry1973

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 09:43 PM

Well working as a paralegal certainly won't cut it:

 

http://theconcourse....dium=socialflow



#19 RushDoggie

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 10:25 PM

In my industry and many others, there are thousands of jobs unfilled. But you need a specific education and skill set to do them.

 

We need more people looking at what the job market needs before they invest in college, and more colleges offering degree and certificate programs that meet that need (and are not for-profit diploma mills looking to cash in on Federal loan money).


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one dog shy of a crazy dog lady...

 

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#20 fenderjazz

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 03:14 AM

In my industry and many others, there are thousands of jobs unfilled. But you need a specific education and skill set to do them.

We need more people looking at what the job market needs before they invest in college, and more colleges offering degree and certificate programs that meet that need (and are not for-profit diploma mills looking to cash in on Federal loan money).


I think your industry is unique in that there is a proper apprenticeship process in place. Assuming you're still in healthcare that is. Others not so much.

I think our generation encourages the future generation to find it's passion in life and seek it. Work to live rather than live to work like we did. I'm thinking that may have always been such a good thing.




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