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#21 grep

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Posted 29 January 2016 - 03:43 AM

Wikipedia has this photo, taken by a tracking camera, showing the crew cabin intact in the moments after the disintegration:

 

Challenger_breakup_cabin.jpg

 

At least some of the crew were likely alive and at least briefly conscious after the breakup, as the four recovered Personal Egress Air Packs (PEAPs) on the flight deck were found to have been activated.[26] Investigators found their remaining unused air supply consistent with the expected consumption during the 2 minute 45 second post-breakup trajectory.

 

While analyzing the wreckage, investigators discovered that several electrical system switches on Pilot Mike Smith's right-hand panel had been moved from their usual launch positions. Fellow astronaut Richard Mullane wrote, "These switches were protected with lever locks that required them to be pulled outward against a spring force before they could be moved to a new position." Later tests established that neither force of the explosion nor the impact with the ocean could have moved them, indicating that Smith made the switch changes, presumably in a futile attempt to restore electrical power to the cockpit after the crew cabin detached from the rest of the orbiter.[27]

 

Whether the crew members remained conscious long after the breakup is unknown, and largely depends on whether the detached crew cabin maintained pressure integrity. If it did not, the time of useful consciousness at that altitude is just a few seconds; the PEAPs supplied only unpressurized air, and hence would not have helped the crew to retain consciousness. If, on the other hand, the cabin was not depressurized or only slowly depressurizing, they may have been conscious for the entire fall until impact. Recovery of the cabin found that the middeck floor had not suffered buckling or tearing, as would result from a rapid decompression, thus providing some evidence that the depressurization may have not happened all at once.

 

https://en.wikipedia...lenger_disaster

 

Thanks. 

 

BTW, That's the front half of the shuttle there... nose pointing to the left.


Rogue-One-Death-Star-Installment.jpg

 

May The Force Be With Us...

 


#22 Greg

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Posted 29 January 2016 - 04:04 AM

I had always heard that their deaths were caused by impact.  Hopefully they weren't conscious on the way down.  

 

I also heard an interview tonight with one of the 2 Morton Thiokol engineers who were trying to prevent the launch.  NASA didn't listen and that's what happened.  It was on NPR if you want to look for it.  The guy spent many years in a deep depression because of this.  Now, at 89, he's spoken out since the last time he spoke about it publicly in 86.  Tough story to hear...I'll see if I can dig it up.  



#23 Greg

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Posted 29 January 2016 - 04:06 AM

Here is the story about the engineer.


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#24 grep

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Posted 29 January 2016 - 04:49 AM

Thanks Greg,  To add to the story a bit, as I understand it there was a big push to launch so that Ronnie could talk about it during his speech that night.  

 

As for this guy coming out now, good on him. At 89, the filters are off and no shits are given. :)


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#25 Always the Winner

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Posted 29 January 2016 - 08:53 AM

In an odd sort of way, Morton Thiokol was the catalyst that made me quit my job and move back to Connecticut. I was working for a bottled water company in '02, and Thiokol was my largest customer. I'd pull into their receiving warehouse, and a guy would forklift all the racks of water off, and then load racks of empties back on. 10 minutes, day done. Drive 90 minutes back to SLC and go home. Then one day they decided that they wanted ME to start delivering the water to the entire facility, about 50 buildings. 10 minutes would've turned into 8 hours. That, timed with Rush's announcement that the Vapor Trails tour would begin in Hartford, sealed the deal. Quit my job and moved home.

I used to wonder where on the facility the discovery was made that the O-rings were faulty.

Hey...where's Perry?


#26 GhostWriter

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Posted 29 January 2016 - 12:35 PM

In an odd sort of way, Morton Thiokol was the catalyst that made me quit my job and move back to Connecticut. I was working for a bottled water company in '02, and Thiokol was my largest customer. I'd pull into their receiving warehouse, and a guy would forklift all the racks of water off, and then load racks of empties back on. 10 minutes, day done. Drive 90 minutes back to SLC and go home. Then one day they decided that they wanted ME to start delivering the water to the entire facility, about 50 buildings. 10 minutes would've turned into 8 hours. That, timed with Rush's announcement that the Vapor Trails tour would begin in Hartford, sealed the deal. Quit my job and moved home.

I used to wonder where on the facility the discovery was made that the O-rings were faulty.

 

So some engineer was dehydrated, mind not functioning properly, made some bad O-rings.....way to go ATW.


It is true, that a little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.

- Francis Bacon

 


#27 Greg

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Posted 30 January 2016 - 12:17 AM

Yea, thanks AtW.  You suck...



#28 Always the Winner

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Posted 30 January 2016 - 12:31 AM

Bullshit. I trained my own replacement, because I'm that kinda guy. Who knows how long he lasted....

Hey...where's Perry?


#29 Hemisfears

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Posted 30 January 2016 - 11:38 AM

More than 30 years ago, NASA launched seven crew members to space on the space shuttle Challenger, but they never got there.

Seventy-three seconds after lift-off, one of the shuttle's fuel tanks failed, generating a rapid cascade of events that culminated with a fireball in the sky, eventually killing all the passengers on board.

While we all probably know this story, there's another equally tragic account from engineer Bob Ebeling that strikes a chord with us for a different reason.

The night before the disaster, Ebeling, along with four other engineers, had tried to halt the launch, according to an exclusive interview from NPR with Ebeling.

The five engineers worked for NASA contractor Morton Thiokol, who manufactured the shuttle's rocket boosters — the two rockets on either side of a shuttle that fired upon lift off.

They knew that this mission would involve the coldest launch in history, and that the shuttle's rocket boosters weren't designed to function properly under such extreme temperatures.

The night before the explosion, Ebeling said in the NPR interview, he'd told his wife: "It's going to blow up."

Thirty years later, he still suffers from guilt.

"I think that was one of the mistakes that God made," Ebeling says softly during the interview. "He shouldn't have picked me for the job. But next time I talk to him, I'm gonna ask him, 'Why me? You picked a loser.'"

 

http://www.businessi...rs-later-2016-1






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