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#1 chemistry1973

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 04:48 PM

My parents just left after an extended stay. Drinking and home cooked meals every night. I figure I could stand to lose 15 pounds. I excercise, but that did little to stave off the pasta, beer and wine.

My plan is to not feel like absolute dogshit once thanksgiving is over. So my question is, how would any of you approach getting back in shape in relatively quick manner?

#2 MrSkeptic

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 05:01 PM

My parents just left after an extended stay. Drinking and home cooked meals every night. I figure I could stand to lose 15 pounds. I excercise, but that did little to stave off the pasta, beer and wine.

My plan is to not feel like absolute dogshit once thanksgiving is over. So my question is, how would any of you approach getting back in shape in relatively quick manner?

 

I read about Penn Jillette doing a 1000 calorie a day diet along with the 7 Minute Workout where he lost a lot of weight, and I tried that but went with 1250 calories a day and I lost weight pretty quickly. I didn't even do the exercises daily either. I didn't change what I ate because I was already eating pretty healthy, I just changed portion sizes and cut way back on desserts. It's a little work at the beginning weighing stuff to get the right portions and calories, but after a while you get the hang of how many slices of lunch meat are enough for the calories you want. 

 

I was pleasantly surprised that I could still eat a ham sandwich with Cheetos and a little Pepsi for lunch and have that fit into the daily calorie limit. Using calories instead of certain foods, you can tailor it to what you like to eat. If you prefer something calorie heavy, you'll just have to make up for it somewhere else with less calories. 


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#3 Inspector 12

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 05:11 PM

I lost a bunch of weight on a modified high protein diet.  Modified in that the carbs you eat are eaten at breakfast.  So oatmeal, toast, whatever, you can have at breakfast.  Lunch is your big meal of the day.  A protein w/ a salad...any sort of protein.  Your evening meal is more of a snack.  Piece of cheese, vegetable or fruit.  The idea being that you stop eating the bulk of your calories.relatively early in the day.   It takes a couple days to get used to not eating much in the evening.  But if you can do it you'll find the weight will come off, especially if you continue exercising.  And after a while you'll find that eating a large dinner is kind of strange.  And that after you get over the early evening hump it's not as difficult to go w/out.  Look up intermittent fasting...this is sort of a modified version of it.  A lot of people who try intermittent fasting  just skip breakfast.  But I find that more draining since I run in the morning.  Skipping dinner for me is easier and works better at taking the weight off (for me).  :)


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#4 Moving Target

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 01:59 PM

My parents just left after an extended stay. Drinking and home cooked meals every night. I figure I could stand to lose 15 pounds. I excercise, but that did little to stave off the pasta, beer and wine.

My plan is to not feel like absolute dogshit once thanksgiving is over. So my question is, how would any of you approach getting back in shape in relatively quick manner?

 

Reduce your carb intake, increase protein intake, and ride a bike a lot.  Fifteen pounds came off me in three months.



#5 Valium

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 10:45 AM

Eat what you want, but cycle on average 80 km per day. I lost one kg per week.



#6 fenderjazz

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 02:25 PM

I lost 210lbs (so far) on a liquid diet.  I necroposted here because I'm sure there are some of us who want to talk about weight loss as well as maintenance.  Focusing on the food part here.  For those of you maintaining weight how are you doing it?

 

low carb?

keto?

veganism?

basic portion control?

 

I assume exercise is part of anything.  That's a given, but also for those trying to lose, a lot of theories have been turned on their ear in recent years.  Diet and exercise, together, don't necessarily go together during the active weight loss phase.  The theory is that putting the body in starvation mode at that time reduces the chances for maintaining weight at a high enough calorie level to be satisfying for most people.  

 

Anyway, not trying to toot my own horn here but here to listen to people who want to get on or are already on this journey.



#7 SJS

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 04:55 PM

Holy crap, FJ, congratulations.  That's seriously hard to do.

 

I've never been overweight by more than 5 pounds by the technical definition (BMI > 25).  However, last summer I decided I was sick of the tight feeling when I buttoned my pants, and didn't like the love handles.  So I made a point of caloric restriction, measuring out my breakfast cereal, avoiding snacks, and chewing a lot of sugar free gum in lieu of food.  I would occasionally skip a meal as well, breakfast or lunch.  I have always exercised (weight lifting twice a week and pick up basketball twice a week) and that continued.  In about 3 months I dropped 18-20 pounds, got my BMI from the 25 area down to the 22.5 area, and found not only my 32 pants comfortable (actually falling off) but my 30s comfortable as well. 

 

I've maintained this since about October, and I have relaxed my caloric restriction.  I now have snacks.  However, I seem to have adopted a habit of much better portion control at meals.  My old mode was to eat my portion and then all of the leftovers the rest of the family didn't eat.  Now I'm comfortable eating just my portion.  I don't think that habit completely explains it, I think there must have been some physiological changes as well.

 

I do not believe in anything but reduction in calories for weight loss.  I think all diets that work (liquid diet, paleo, whatever) work by virtue of calorie reduction.  I think diets that can be maintained over the long run are those that institute habits (slower chewing, comfort with smaller portions) and that don't deny preferences (e.g., I'll still eat ribs, but I'll be happy with less).

 

However, I've never had to lose 200 pounds.  I know from losing 20 that this would be difficult x 10. 


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#8 The Macallan

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 05:33 PM

FJ – very well done and I hope you continue that journey of losing, then maintaining.

 

For me, running has been key. About 13 years ago I bought a treadmill and “The Idiots Guide to Running”. I went from couch potato to running 30 minutes non-stop in a month. I also significantly cut down on the bad foods – burgers/fries, pizza, etc. Sitting at a desk 15 hours a day, eating bad lunches 5 days a week, then would go home late and swing by McD or Taco Bell before bed. The running shifted outside, got more intense and I ran several marathons, losing 30 lbs in the process. While training I fell back into some bad eating habits because my calories burned were still above my intake. Though I still run about once a week, my last race was 4+ years ago so the weight has been creeping up. I’ve plateaued by trying to eat sensibly, stay away from fast food, cooking meals rather than picking up at a drive thru, etc. I love to eat so I’m desperately trying to get my running going again to the point where I can log serious miles and eat more.  ;)


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#9 SJS

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 06:48 PM

I'm not a big believer in "bad foods" and "good foods".  However, there are energy dense foods - and restaurant foods (fast food or sit down) tend to be pretty energy dense.  Then there are also "worthless calories" like pure sugar candies or sodas, which offer nothing but calories.  All of these are sources of excess calories that one can do without.

 

There is an interesting phenomenon also with large meals.  If people are asked to guess the number of calories in a plate of food, they do pretty good for low calorie plates, but progressively underestimate with greater calories.  So as an example, a person shown 400 calories on a plate might guess around 400.  Shown 600 calories they might guess around 550.  Shown 1200 calories, they might guess around 1000.  (We do the same thing with anything - guessing how much something weighs, or how many pennies are in a jar - we're accurate at low amounts, slightly off for medium amounts, and substantially underestimate for large amounts.)  The take home message is that when you eat dinner (tends to be the largest meal) or you eat at a restaurant (where we tend to go for the most economical value - most food for our money) we will underestimate what we've eaten.  Then we'll give ourselves permission for dessert or a snack later.


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#10 The Macallan

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 07:34 PM

Soda and similar high sugar beverages are completely worthless. I’ve almost completely cut those out of my life. IMO, the first thing that must go in any diet/maintenance plan. 


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#11 fenderjazz

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 08:12 PM

I'm exploring more low carb/keto maintenance options mainly because they mimic what I'm on right now (high fat/moderate protein liquid diet).  The concept of those is to get your body to run on fat instead of sugar.



#12 Slim

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 08:39 PM

I've been fortunate in never really having to worry about my weight, because I've always been fairly, er, slim. But over Christmas and New Year I consumed Scotch, mince pies and chocolate in industrial quantities and I was alarmed to find that I was 180 pounds when I weighed myself. Still not too bad for 6'2" and I certainly didn't look overweight, but even so - substantially more than the 175 pounds which is my general notion of my "usual weight".

 

The only reason I care about this at all is long distance cycling. Four years ago, before I started cycling regularly I had no idea whatever what my weight was, I had no reason particularly to care and I hadn't weighed myself since I was a kid, playing with my Mum's scales.

 

But lightweight bikes are quite expensive and cancelling out one of the key benefits of shelling out four figures on a bike by hauling 5 unnecessary pounds up a series of inclines over 100 miles or more is not what you want.

 

So in early January I returned to my regime of very occasional drinking, I stopped eating chocolate and dessert completely, and I started to spend more time on my bike trainer in the garage, when the weather was not favourable to actual road cycling. I was down to 174 in a couple of weeks. After seeing this thread I weighed myself again and I'm at less than 171 currently. I hope to do a 200 mile ride in the summer and it will be really nice if I can have my weight down below 173 or so when I do that.


Of course your weight fluctuates through a typical day so you can't take the exact figures too seriously, but there's certainly a pleasing downward trend.



#13 chemistry1973

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 08:40 PM

I’m glad you revived this post FJ.

So funny - I’m in the same boat more than 2 years after my original post. Tried on some pants this AM. Goddamn it.

I blame not running like I used to. And alcohol.

Some inspiring posts here peeps - keep it up!

#14 nickslikk2112

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 10:36 PM

Crikey! I'm slimmer than Slim!

I'm 6'2" and weigh around 164 pounds. Still about four pounds heavier than I was before Christmas.

 

Seven years ago I weighed around 215 pounds and my trousers were splitting. I cut down on the amount of food ate, mainly dropping chocolate biscuits, I cut out most beer and exercised more. I lost 45 pounds in three months. I then took up cycling and got down to my current weight. I now eat lots of chocolate biscuits again and drink more beer. I also have lots of new pairs of trousers,

 

Moderation and moderate exercise. A simple equation. 


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#15 SJS

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 12:55 AM

I've been fortunate in never really having to worry about my weight, because I've always been fairly, er, slim. But over Christmas and New Year I consumed Scotch, mince pies and chocolate in industrial quantities and I was alarmed to find that I was 180 pounds when I weighed myself. Still not too bad for 6'2" and I certainly didn't look overweight, but even so - substantially more than the 175 pounds which is my general notion of my "usual weight".
 
The only reason I care about this at all is long distance cycling. Four years ago, before I started cycling regularly I had no idea whatever what my weight was, I had no reason particularly to care and I hadn't weighed myself since I was a kid, playing with my Mum's scales.
 
But lightweight bikes are quite expensive and cancelling out one of the key benefits of shelling out four figures on a bike by hauling 5 unnecessary pounds up a series of inclines over 100 miles or more is not what you want.
 
So in early January I returned to my regime of very occasional drinking, I stopped eating chocolate and dessert completely, and I started to spend more time on my bike trainer in the garage, when the weather was not favourable to actual road cycling. I was down to 174 in a couple of weeks. After seeing this thread I weighed myself again and I'm at less than 171 currently. I hope to do a 200 mile ride in the summer and it will be really nice if I can have my weight down below 173 or so when I do that.

Of course your weight fluctuates through a typical day so you can't take the exact figures too seriously, but there's certainly a pleasing downward trend.


-It’s amazing how sneaky 5-8 pounds can be.

-it’s amazing how much 5-10 pound loss can improve your athletic performance. For you, cycling. For me, I’m able to guard college kids on the basketball court.

-I weighed myself twice a day for three straight months. I found the daily variability fascinating, and the overall downward trend very satisfying.

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#16 Greg

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 05:54 AM

I just wanted to commend Joe on his weight loss...saw it on FB and was SERIOUSLY IMPRESSED.  

 

Like Slim, I've never had to worry about weight gain.  I'm 5' 8" at 155, I ride mountain bikes about 75 miles a week of trail miles, did Taekwondo in my 40s that was a very rigorous workout and I lift a little, as well.  I was a TKD instructor and would try to help adults who wanted to lose weight in the program.  Many tried, but few, if any, actually lost weight.  It's because they didn't change their eating habits.  Exercise is only one part of it...and it's a small part.  Diet is almost always the problem...

 

I also believe that insulin reaction and carbs are problematic to the whole process, as well.  I, for example, have a diet very high in protein.  I will carb up before a ride, burn it off, protein afterwards for recovery.  But for many people, eating the wrong things causes an insulin spike/reaction that really complicates and makes the weight loss goals harder to achieve.  I would suggest eating food according to their glycemic value.  Really watch carbs, sugar and keep the protein the main focus of the diet.  Sugar is in everything, avoid as much of that as possible.

 

I'm certainly no expert in this, but I've learned a bit trying to work with my students who expected all the exercise to shed the weight.  They became frustrated when it didn't, and then quit because they didn't change what and how much they were eating.  

 

And really Joe, that's awesome, my man...just think, you lost more about 50 pounds more than my entire weight.  I can't imagine what that must feel like when you're going up stairs or just going through life...GOOD FOR YOU, MAN!  That's completely awesome...



#17 fenderjazz

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 02:33 PM

^^^

Thanks Greg

 

I've done this before (and gained it all back!) so maintenance is where I am focusing.  Last time it was the 90s.  Everything was low fat/cholesterol and high sugar.  I became a vegan because I was convinced it would help me.  I gained most of my weight back on a vegan diet because it put me on the insulin rollercoaster.

 

Now I'm focusing on glycemic index, and may even go the full keto route which many of my friends are on.



#18 GhostWriter

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 04:42 PM

I did a hardcore keto diet for the month of January. Ate primarily bacon, beef, some fish, and salad. Lost 21 pounds in 31 days. Really just wanted to drop 15 but I haven't felt better. Fat and protein work for me; not everyone is suited to a keto diet. But completely eliminating sugar and the starchy carbs will not only help you lose those little rolls, but will make your mind and body feel so much better.

 

The first week is always the hardest. Going through the "carb flu" isn't easy but when you come out the other side the feeling of unlimited energy is hard to believe.


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#19 Slim

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 05:09 PM

And really Joe, that's awesome, my man...just think, you lost more about 50 pounds more than my entire weight.  I can't imagine what that must feel like when you're going up stairs or just going through life...GOOD FOR YOU, MAN!  That's completely awesome...

 

Agreed, that is a phenomenal achievement. I certainly couldn't lose 210 pounds. I'd have negative mass, and gravity would repel me into space.

 

Just weighed myself again and I'm now at 169.0 according to the scales. First time I've ever seen my weight dip below 170 since I bought the scales a couple of years ago. However I think that's mostly because I've been pole-axed by a virus of some sort this last three days, and I'm basically wasting away.



#20 scott14

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 05:11 PM

Wow Joe, that's a great accomplishment!  I'm 6'2" and broke 250 lbs for the first time ever in my life last Fall, and hit a record 256 by New Years Day.  I decided to go low carb for a while (love my carbs!) and have lost 18 lbs in about seven weeks, weighing in at 238 these past couple of days.  I feel on target for my goal to hit 235 by my birthday in mid-March, and 225 by summer, which is my happy weight.  I don't look or feel like me much under that.

 

I'm doing a sort of Keto routine.  I've cut almost all white carbs:  flour, potatoes, and rice by about 98%.  I have to taste a little occasionally as a Chef Instructor, my students are paying for feedback.  I had rice once out for Szechuan food, and half a Cubano sandwich and a couple of crostini with a charcuterie board out another night.  Flour is the big one, basically powdered sugar in more complex form, and also the toughest to give up.  Love my pasta, bread, pizza, etc.  I've cut refined sugar and sweeteners (including honey and maple syrup) by about 99.9%, only consuming the most base amounts in a couple of products (like sriracha).  I've also cut cooking/added fats, consciously not going the "Chef route" on how much butter and olive oil I'm adding to foods.  Culinary carbs also carry a lot of our fat consumption:  butter in mashed potatoes or risotto, on bread or for cooking grilled cheese, mayo on a sandwich, olive oil on pasta, mac n cheese, greasy cheese and meats on pizza, fried potatoes and breaded foods, etc, so I'm naturally consuming less fat by cutting those carbs out.  I've been leaning toward leaner meats more often than before, and been slightly more conscious about how much salt I add to my cooking (tough habit for my chef training to break).

 

Sugar is the real enemy of the American diet, empty calories with no other nutritional value.  Everything we eat is loaded with it, and our palates are trained to crave sweet things.  Refined sugar is practically toxic, and the body puts it straight into weight gain.  That kind of gain can only be fought with vigorous exercise and strict calorie counting.  Refined sugar consumption is something everyone should be conscientious of, weigh issues or not.  It's practically poison, and causes a whole host of health issues!  Sugary beverages are probably the absolute worst of the worst, the amount of sugar in soda, iced teas, "energy drinks", coffee drinks, and even fruit juice is appalling and horrendous for anyone.

 

I am still eating some whole grains like spelt and quinoa, and I haven't cut things like sweet potatoes, butternut squash, beets, or the occasional apple that people on a Keto craze cut.  I've never been a big sweets eater, so that's easy, and I hate sugary beverages: soda, sweet tea, fruit juice, or sugar in my coffee, blech!  So I've basically tripled vegetable intake, trying to keep half of that raw, cut carbs overall by a substantial amount, and been conscientious about fat intake.  Eating a lot of eggs, avocado, nuts and seeds, various beans, high protein grains, and being careful to include a lot of high fiber foods.  Lots of big, multi-component salads loaded with lots of mixed and balanced nutrition.

 

The funny part is, and Joe please don't hate me, is that my one indulgence has been beer and wine.  I cut consumption by maybe 40% for the first couple of weeks, but now I'm drinking my usual allotment.  I'm sure I'd be losing weight a little faster, but I'm not looking to torture myself, and the weight is still dropping steadily!  I've basically made it a reward for doing everything else well.

 

My eventual maintenance plan is to go 50/50 and learn to eat this way at least half the time.  Have a high carb meal?  Do a couple of low carb meals following.  Sandwich for lunch, no carbs for dinner.  Planning a pasta dinner, big salad for lunch before and the day after.  And to seriously restrict refined sugar permanently, and make things like the occasional dessert a real treat.  Stuff like that.






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