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#281 baldiepete

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 02:43 PM

Claude Leonetti of French prog band Lazuli can’t use his left arm so he invented a new instrument so he could keep playing.


THE LITTLE STORY OF THE LÉODE

“ In 1986, a motorbike accident deprived me of the use of my left arm(and my guitar!!!). To satisfy my need for sound and music, I explored the world of computer music, synthesizers and recording. However, I still missed my guitar and it was after a dream (I swear it’s true!!!)that the idea came to me of a new type of instrument and so, one morning I got up and I put my idea on paper…During the following week, the hasty sketches became a scale drawing.The name of my imaginary instrument is a mixture of my family name and my first name: Léonetti Claude: Léo…de. My dream was no longer my imagination. By chance, I met Vincent Maury from LAG Innov’art and we worked on my project for two years… The Léode was created in 1995 (yes, in the last century). I say THE Léode ’cause it’s unique(so I’m at the moment the best player of the Léode in the world!!!). In fact the instrument is the improbable mix of a guitar, a synthesizer and a melodic saw (with a piece of wood).The Léode controls a sampler and a multi-effect by midi system.I work on my synthesis or sample sounds, which I hear all around me. That is why in my sound data, we can find the voice of my dog, my cat or my friend Sylvain, without even recognizing them.We can also hear sounds inspired from the guitar, the Sarangui, the Doudouk, and all string instruments including a lot of other non-definable sounds. I release the notes by pressing with my right hand. Here, the strings and keys are channels and the fingers move over the smooth surface (roughly speaking , I practise a kind of gliding sport, which is safe and not yet recognized in the Olympic Games!!!).This is only one part of the story of the Léode… the rest I tell with my instrument on stage or on the albums of LAZULI…”

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#282 baldiepete

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 02:44 PM



#283 Three Eyes

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Posted 05 May 2018 - 07:22 AM

Michel Petrucciani was a French jazz pianist. From birth he had osteogenesis imperfecta, a genetic disease that causes brittle bones and, in his case, short stature. He became one of the most accomplished jazz pianists of his generation despite having arms that caused him pain.

 


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#284 Three Eyes

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Posted 06 May 2018 - 02:31 AM

Tina Turner's "Private Dancer" was written by Mark Knopfler and Jeff Beck plays the guitar solo.


The song was originally intended for Dire Straits' album Love over Gold. The instrumental track was recorded, but Mark Knopfler considered the lyrics unsuitable for a male singer, so the track was cut. Legal restrictions prevented the original recording being used by Tina Turner; so, two years later, it was remade by members of the group. Terry Williams replaced the original drummer Pick Withers. Knopfler did not appear on the track and was replaced by Jeff Beck. Turner told DJ Roger Scott:

 
Roger [Turner's manager] knows Knopfler's manager Ed Bicknell, and Bicknell said, 'I think Mark has a song that could fit Tina, that he never used because he thought it was a song for a girl.' Mark produced the song and sang it, and after he did it he felt that it was not a song for a man, so it was just sitting on the shelf… He gave me the track and I copied it with Dire Straits people – most of them. At first I was going to try to just put my voice on Mark's tapes, but there was a record company problem, so we got Mark's musicians, Dire Straits, and went into the studio... Someone said, 'Why did you select "Private Dancer"? It's a song about a hooker. Is it because you've been a hooker?' And I was shocked... I didn't see her as a hooker... I can be naive about some of these things. But actually the answer is no. I took it because it was an unusual song. I'd never sung a song like it. And I wish you could hear Mark's version of it. He's got a very English-sounding voice... and it was really quite beautiful.... A very arty song... so I put the old soulful touch on it.

 


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#285 Three Eyes

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 02:25 AM

A well-researched breakdown of the Verve's "Bittersweet Symphony" copyright debacle.

 


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#286 Three Eyes

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 11:58 PM


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#287 Three Eyes

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 05:30 AM

Why is there a guy blowing a sax here? How dumb did they think the viewing public was back in the 70s? lol.

 


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#288 Three Eyes

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 10:28 AM

On the album version of Minnie Riperton's "Loving You", Minnie says her daughter's name, Maya, a few times (beginning at 3:25). Her daughter is SNL alum Maya Rudolph.

 

According to the liner notes from Riperton's compilation album Petals, the melody for "Lovin' You" was created to be a distraction for her baby daughter (Maya Rudolph) so that Minnie and her husband Richard could hang out. Maya was in the studio with Riperton on the day it was recorded and Riperton can be heard singing her daughter's name at the end, but only in the unedited or album version. The song fades out early in the radio edit because the disc jockeys felt that the repeated "Maya" was being overdone and that it would be misunderstood as a religious chant.

 

 

On April 5, 1975, Riperton reached the apex of her career with her No. 1 single "Lovin' You". The single was the last release from her 1974 gold album titled Perfect Angel. In January 1976, Riperton was diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent a radical mastectomy. By the time of diagnosis, the cancer had metastasized and she was given about six months to live. Despite the grim prognosis, she continued recording and touring. She was one of the first celebrities to go public with her breast cancer diagnosis but did not disclose she was terminally ill. In 1977, she became a spokesperson for the American Cancer Society. In 1978, she received the American Cancer Society's Courage Award, which was presented to her at the White House by President Jimmy Carter. Riperton died of cancer on July 12, 1979 at age 31.


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#289 Three Eyes

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 04:19 AM

Franksinatramood-rexfeatures_10049s_tran

 

Frank Sinatra and his violent temper

 

Light My Fire really lit his fuse
 
Sinatra bemoaned the rise of rock music in the Sixties and particularly hated The Doors and their song Light my Fire, calling it "ugly and degenerate". When Sinatra was driving home one night it came on the car radio. He switched stations and found that channel playing the same song. He stopped the car and smashed the car radio to bits with his shoe.
 
 
 
And then there's this.... ;^D
 

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#290 fenderjazz

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 01:32 PM

Franksinatramood-rexfeatures_10049s_tran

 

Frank Sinatra and his violent temper

 

Light My Fire really lit his fuse
 
Sinatra bemoaned the rise of rock music in the Sixties and particularly hated The Doors and their song Light my Fire, calling it "ugly and degenerate". When Sinatra was driving home one night it came on the car radio. He switched stations and found that channel playing the same song. He stopped the car and smashed the car radio to bits with his shoe.
 
 
 
And then there's this.... ;^D

 

I think the fact that Jim Morrison was a crooner singing this "jungle music" as he called it what upset him the most.  Morrison was really on par with Sinatra.  Either could have filled the other's shoes in their respective bands and it would have sounded right.  Little Richard, The Beatles, Elvis, were no threat to him.  Morrison was in his own wheelhouse.  I'm sure he felt he was finished at that point, that some new heir apparent to the throne had arrived.



#291 Three Eyes

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 02:42 PM

I think the fact that Jim Morrison was a crooner singing this "jungle music" as he called it what upset him the most.  Morrison was really on par with Sinatra.  Either could have filled the other's shoes in their respective bands and it would have sounded right.  Little Richard, The Beatles, Elvis, were no threat to him.  Morrison was in his own wheelhouse.  I'm sure he felt he was finished at that point, that some new heir apparent to the throne had arrived.

 

Yeah, I also always thought Morrison was mostly an old fashioned singer.

 

Rock 'n' roll was definitely a step down in sophistication from Sinatra and his ilk. I bet on the inside he was terrified of it and for good reason.

 

Interestingly, that Nancy Sinatra version has a Bondish/moddish/orchestral arrangement that comes closer to Sinatra's style than The Doors'.


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#292 Three Eyes

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 02:53 PM

For the heck of it...

 

Caesars Palace in 1970, where Sinatra performed from 1967 to 1970 and 1973 onwards

 

Caesars_Palace_in_1970.jpg


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#293 grep

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 02:57 AM

I've written about this a couple of times here on CP. Here it is again, since peeps are talking about Sinatra:

Let us not forget that on the HYF tour in 87, a rescheduled Sinatra show at the Brendan Byrne Arena in NJ pushed a scheduled Rush show by one night.

So, there was to be a Sinatra show one night in the fall of 87 in NJ. The arena in Rutherford was filled, and it was close to showtime. Then someone realized that the orchestra did not have it's sheet music. Oops.

Cancelled and moved to the next night. No problem, those punks from Toronto who were scheduled to play were bumped.

The Rush show was played one night late, with an incomplete stage set and light show.  I was there. (Then saw them a couple of nights later in MSG)

Nothing was said except for a comment by Geddy during his banter.  Along the lines of "Hello New Jersey, it's great to be here. And we don't need sheet music.".  

 

https://www.nytimes....ast-minute.html

 


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#294 Three Eyes

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 04:27 AM

^^^

 

The cancellation of the Sinatra-Minnelli concert, however, enraged many of the 19,000 people who had purchased tickets.
 
''It was such a horrendous lack of respect for the fans,'' said Adele Schildkraut. ''They knew darn well that the concert was not going to go on way before they canceled.''

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#295 Three Eyes

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 04:30 AM

Nancy Sinatra is 78. There's a wow music fact for ya.

 

Sinatra was signed to her father's label, Reprise Records, in 1961. Her first single, "Cuff Links and a Tie Clip", went largely unnoticed. However, subsequent singles charted in Europe and Japan. Without a hit in the US by 1965, she was on the verge of being dropped. Her singing career received a boost with the help of songwriter/producer/arranger Lee Hazlewood, who had been making records for ten years, notably with Duane Eddy. Hazlewood became Sinatra's inspiration.[citation needed] He had her sing in a lower key and crafted songs for her. Bolstered by an image overhaul—including bleached-blonde hair, frosted lips, heavy eye make-up and Carnaby Street fashions—Sinatra made her mark on the American (and British) music scene in early 1966 with "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'", its title inspired by a line in Robert Aldrich's 1963 western comedy 4 for Texas starring her father and Dean Martin. One of her many hits written by Hazlewood, it received three Grammy Award nominations, including two for Sinatra and one for arranger Billy Strange. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. She appeared on TV in high boots, and with colorfully dressed go-go dancers, a craze during the late '60s, and created a popular and enduring image of the Swinging Sixties.

 

She was about to be dropped by her dad's label. It's a tough business.

 

220px-Nancy_Sinatra.JPG

 

 

8b1cfb0b488af1c72b4bdae2312aac25.jpg

 

Once she went blonde, that was it.


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#296 fenderjazz

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 02:12 PM

^^^
True but you can’t hear the blonde. Another woman saved her. One of my bass heroes. Carol Kaye’s infectious baseline sold the song. The image overhaul helped too I’m sure.

#297 Three Eyes

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 03:19 PM

I think it was mostly Lee Hazelwood reinventing her and actually writing "These Boots." Apparently they were a match made in heaven and at just the right moment. But yeah that bass part was a huge hook that rang throughout the pop landscape.

 

Interesting story behind the song too. (And according to Wiki, it looks like that bass slide-down was performed by Chuck Berghofer on upright bass although Carol Kaye was also on the track playing electric bass. He was a jazz bassist and that part is very jazzy indeed.)


Recording

 

Lee Hazlewood intended to record the song himself, saying that "it's not really a girl's song", but Sinatra talked him out of it, saying that "coming from a guy it was harsh and abusive, but was perfect for a little girl to sing". Hazlewood agreed. Sinatra's recording of the song was made with the help of Los Angeles session musicians known as the Wrecking Crew. This session included Hal Blaine on drums, Al Casey, Tommy Tedesco, and Billy Strange on guitars, Ollie Mitchell, Roy Caton and Lew McCreary on horns, Carol Kaye on electric bass and Chuck Berghofer on double bass, providing the notable bass line. Nick Bonney was the guitarist for the Nelson Riddle Orchestra.

 

The song is still quite popular. It was just used in Ocean's 8 and there's an upload of the promotional film on YouTube that has 118 million views! It's so trapped in the 60s yet it's still somehow timeless....probably because it's just so 60s cool not to mention its still relevant female empowerment angle.

 

This is titillating even by today's standards.

 

 

 

Quite a nice write up on the song if anyone is interested.

 

http://www.rebeatmag...-nancy-sinatra/


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#298 chemistry1973

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 04:05 PM

Vinnie Vincent - pre-Kiss - wrote many of the songs in Happy Days and Joanie Loves Chachi:

In 1980, Vincent moved to Los Angeles, California where he became a staff songwriter for the television series Happy Days and Joanie Loves Chachi. Many of the series songs were written on Vincent's acoustic guitar while sitting at the Cunninghams' kitchen table on the Happy Days set, during off-time from the show's rehearsal schedule.

#299 Three Eyes

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 04:38 PM

^^^

 

I had that one covered all the way back in 2016. lol.

 

http://rushmessagebo...e-4#entry132177


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#300 chemistry1973

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 05:19 PM

Hahaha.




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