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#201 Saint Ronnie

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 02:19 PM

You're welcome.

 

Can you fill me in on the joke - I want to thank you too


"The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is...people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction (i.e., the reality of experience) and the distinction between true and false (i.e., the standards of thought) no longer exist."~ Hannah Arendt.  The Origins of Totalitarianism. 1967

 

I confess I had no desire to die in a Southeast Asian rice paddy - John Bolton


#202 fenderjazz

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 02:36 PM

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#203 Wandering Hermit

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 11:50 PM

Can you fill me in on the joke - I want to thank you too

 

Data storage technology has been my day job for 20 odd years now.


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#204 Valium

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 08:16 AM

Data porn storage technology has been my day job for 20 odd years now.

fixed



#205 Wandering Hermit

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 01:12 AM

fixed

 

That too! Proud to help!


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#206 Valium

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 08:04 AM

You and Al Gore have made life worthwhile, and Ian Anderson watches me



#207 Saint Ronnie

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 12:56 PM

Ahh - a fine job you have done then, WH


"The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is...people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction (i.e., the reality of experience) and the distinction between true and false (i.e., the standards of thought) no longer exist."~ Hannah Arendt.  The Origins of Totalitarianism. 1967

 

I confess I had no desire to die in a Southeast Asian rice paddy - John Bolton


#208 Three Eyes

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 12:49 AM

Did actors inspire rock and roll?

 

From the Wiki page on James Dean

 

Youth culture and music


Numerous commentators have asserted that James Dean had a singular influence on the development of rock and roll music. According to David R. Shumway, a researcher in American culture and cultural theory at Carnegie Mellon University, James Dean was the first iconic figure of youthful rebellion and "a harbinger of youth-identity politics". The persona Dean projected in his movies, especially Rebel Without a Cause, influenced Elvis Presley[98] and many other musicians who followed,[99] including the American rockers Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent.
 
In their book, Live Fast, Die Young: The Wild Ride of Making Rebel Without a Cause, Lawrence Frascella and Al Weisel wrote, "Ironically, though Rebel had no rock music on its soundtrack, the film's sensibility—and especially the defiant attitude and effortless cool of James Dean—would have a great impact on rock. The music media would often see Dean and rock as inextricably linked [....] The industry trade magazine Music Connection even went so far as to call Dean "the first rock star." "[100]
 
As rock and roll became a revolutionary force that affected the culture of countries around the world,[101] James Dean acquired a mythic status that cemented his place as a rock and roll icon[102]. Dean himself listened to music ranging from African tribal music[103] to the modern classical music of Stravinsky[104] and Bartók,[105] to contemporary singers such as Frank Sinatra.[104] While the magnetism and charisma manifested by Dean onscreen appealed to people of all ages and sexuality,[106] his persona of youthful rebellion provided a template for succeeding generations of youth to model themselves on.[107][108]
 
In his book, The Origins of Cool in Postwar America, Joel Dinerstein describes how James Dean and Marlon Brando eroticized the rebel archetype in film,[109] and how Elvis Presley, following their lead, did the same in music. Dinerstein details the dynamics of this eroticization and its effect on teenage girls with few sexual outlets.[110] Presley said in a 1956 interview with Lloyd Shearer for Parade Magazine, "I've made a study of Marlon Brando. And I've made a study of poor Jimmy Dean. I've made a study of myself, and I know why girls, at least the young 'uns, go for us. We're sullen, we're broodin', we're something of a menace. I don't understand it exactly, but that's what the girls like in men. I don't know anything about Hollywood, but I know you can't be sexy if you smile. You can't be a rebel if you grin."[111]
 
Dean and Presley have often been represented in academic literature and journalism as embodying the frustration felt by young white Americans with the values of their parents,[112][113] and depicted as avatars of the youthful unrest endemic to rock and roll style and attitude. The rock historian Greil Marcus characterized them as symbols of tribal teenage identity who provided an image that young people in the 1950s could relate to and imitate.[114][115] In his book Lonely Places, Dangerous Ground: Nicholas Ray in American Cinema, Paul Anthony Johnson wrote that James Dean's acting in Rebel Without a Cause provided a "performance model for Presley, Buddy Holly, and Bob Dylan, all of whom borrowed elements of Dean's performance in their own carefully constructed star personas."[116] Frascella and Weisel wrote, "As rock music became the defining expression of youth in the 1960s, the influence of Rebel was conveyed to a new generation."[100]
 
Rock musicians as diverse as Buddy Holly,[117] Bob Dylan, and David Bowie regarded James Dean as a formative influence.[118] The playwright and actor Sam Shepard interviewed Dylan in 1986 and wrote a play based on their conversation, in which Dylan discusses the early influence of James Dean on him personally.[119] A young Bob Dylan, still in his folk music period, consciously evoked James Dean visually on the cover of his album, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan,[120] and later on Highway 61 Revisited,[121] cultivating an image that his biographer Bob Spitz called "James Dean with a guitar".[122] James Dean has long been invoked in the lyrics of rock songs, famously in songs such as "A Young Man Is Gone" by the Beach Boys (1963),[123][124] "James Dean" by the Eagles (1974),[125][126] and "James Dean" by the Goo Goo Dolls (1989).[127][128]

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#209 chemistry1973

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 04:24 AM

And just about every song by The Smiths.


But seriously, James Dean had a massive influence on the culture of the 50s and I’m not surprised that he would impact rock culture that way - I’d say Brando and Mitchum had similar effects.

#210 Three Eyes

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 05:52 PM

An image of Hitler was originally considered for the cover of Sgt. Pepper's.

 

diana-dorscomp.jpg


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#211 fenderjazz

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 02:45 PM

And just about every song by The Smiths.


But seriously, James Dean had a massive influence on the culture of the 50s and I’m not surprised that he would impact rock culture that way - I’d say Brando and Mitchum had similar effects.

 

Dean's influence was most felt through those he influenced.  



#212 Wandering Hermit

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 01:26 AM

Canadian band "Rush" once wrote a song about marijuana use!


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#213 Three Eyes

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 06:00 PM

Very good rundown of the sorry state of popular music coming out of the majors these days. Can I get a millennial whoop anyone??

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#214 Valium

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 01:56 PM

Johnny Cash at Folsom prison was recorded 50 years ago today



#215 Three Eyes

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 03:29 PM

Asshole move by Radiohead.

 


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#216 Three Eyes

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 07:37 PM

Good choice Boz Scaggs' manager. lol.

 

The producers of the movie Saturday Night Fever asked for permission to use "Lowdown" but Scaggs' manager turned them down and instead used it in the movie Looking for Mr. Goodbar.


Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#217 Valium

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 02:23 PM

Keyboardist Rick Wakeman of the band Yes (who were recording Tales from Topographic Oceans in the next studio) was brought in as a session player, appearing on "Sabbra Cadabra".[4] Wakeman refused payment from the band and was ultimately compensated with beer for his contribution.[5



#218 fenderjazz

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 02:34 PM

Keyboardist Rick Wakeman of the band Yes (who were recording Tales from Topographic Oceans in the next studio) was brought in as a session player, appearing on "Sabbra Cadabra".[4] Wakeman refused payment from the band and was ultimately compensated with beer for his contribution.[5

 

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#219 Three Eyes

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 10:48 AM

From Eva Cassidy's Wiki page...

 

Eva Marie Cassidy (February 2, 1963 – November 2, 1996) was an American singer and guitarist known for her interpretations of jazz and blues. In 1992, she released her first album, The Other Side, a set of duets with go-go musician Chuck Brown, followed by the 1996 live solo album titled Live at Blues Alley. Although she had been honored by the Washington Area Music Association, she was virtually unknown outside her native Washington, D.C.. She died of melanoma in 1996.
 
Two years after her death, Cassidy's music was brought to the attention of British audiences, when her versions of "Fields of Gold" and "Over the Rainbow" were played by Mike Harding and Terry Wogan on BBC Radio 2. Following the overwhelming response, a camcorder recording of "Over the Rainbow", taken at Blues Alley in Washington by her friend Bryan McCulley, was shown on BBC Two's Top of the Pops 2. Shortly afterwards, the compilation album Songbird climbed to the top of the UK Albums Charts, almost three years after its initial release. The chart success in the United Kingdom and Ireland led to increased recognition worldwide. Her posthumously released recordings, including three UK number-one records, have sold more than ten million copies.[1] Her music has also charted top 10 positions in Australia, Germany, Sweden, Norway and Switzerland.[2]
 
....
 
Restored footage of Eva Cassidy performing Over The Rainbow. The performance took place at the Blues Alley jazz supper club in Georgetown, DC, on the 3rd January 1996.
 
 
She died 11 months after this recording never knowing she was bound for stardom.

Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#220 Three Eyes

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Posted 28 January 2018 - 10:57 AM

From Tawny Kitaen's wiki...

 

Kitaen dated Ratt guitarist Robbin Crosby during and after high school. She followed the bands to LA in the late 70s to find a career of her own. Kitaen married Whitesnake singer David Coverdale in 1989. Nevertheless, she had an affair with O.J. Simpson during Simpson's marriage to Nicole Brown[10][11] and her marriage to Coverdale.[12] Coverdale and Kitaen divorced in 1991. "I woke up from the nightmare… a few million dollars later," Coverdale remarked. "Yorkshire lads shouldn't marry American actresses."[13]

 

That's her on both these covers.

 

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Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.





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