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"The X-ray is her siren song" - but how?


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#1 Moving Target

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 06:57 PM

Mrs MT and I watched the Christopher Nolan film Interstellar last night and enjoyed it very much.  Nice to see some properly hard SF, with lots of little nods to 2001: A Space Odyssey.   Super score from Hans Zimmer.

 

So there's this black hole, right?

 

As matter approaches the event horizon, spiraling down the 3D (or 4D?) plughole, accelerating faster and faster, smashing itself subatomic particles by friction, reaching temperatures around ten million Kelvin.....

 

Which is so hot that it kicks out radiation in the X-ray band, right?

 

So.....

 

If light (which has no mass) cannot get out of the black hole because of the spacetime distortion into the 3D (or 4D?) plughole....

 

How can we detect the X-rays?  How are they getting out?



#2 SJS

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 07:06 PM

The x-rays that we detect are the ones created at the event horizon, just outside the distance where the escape velocity = c. 


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#3 Moving Target

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 07:17 PM

The x-rays that we detect are the ones created at the event horizon, just outside the distance where the escape velocity = c. 

 

 

I guessed as much - but how come we can't see the visible light from the same area?  Is it too hot there to emit visible light?  If so, why X-rays and not gamma rays? 

 

Further out from the disc where it is cooler, are longer waves such as microwaves being generated?

 

Thermal radiation third line.






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