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If the moon were a pixel


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#1 SJS

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 12:34 AM

I've seen various attempts to measure the scale of the astronomical before, and this one's pretty good.

 

http://joshworth.com...olarsystem.html


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#2 Greg

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 01:38 AM

That's a lot of scrolling...



#3 MrSkeptic

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 02:55 AM

I made it to Mars. I get it. We're but a pimple on the ass of the universe. 


They said I could be anything, so I became a disappointment.

 

 


#4 bordercollie

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 02:59 AM

I made it to Mars. I get it. We're but a pimple on the ass of the universe. 

And you're just a little glob of pus from said pimple.


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#5 grep

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 03:06 AM

Awesome.

 

I got lost on the way to Saturn and ended up here. Go figure.


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May The Force Be With Us...

 


#6 The Enemy Within

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 10:21 AM

Wheeling through the galaxies, headed for the heart of Cygnus.

 

Boy, that must have been very, very dull voyage for the most part!



#7 Moving Target

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 10:48 AM

Got bored at 1.4 billion km.  Which is about 1/10 the distance of Voyager 1 from Earth.

 

I think Roger Rigid (remember him?) reckoned the Voyager is going to take 15,000 years to pass through the Oort Cloud.  It's through the Bow Shock now, IIRC.


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#8 Always the Winner

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 11:59 AM

Wheeling through the galaxies, headed for the heart of Cygnus.

Boy, that must have been very, very dull voyage for the most part!


If you're leaving from our weary world and headed for the heart of Cygnus, why would you need to wheel through any other galaxies? It's in our own.
Assholes. Their world is in trouble and they're joyriding in Daddy's spaceship
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Hey...where's Perry?


#9 The Enemy Within

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 12:08 PM

NASA's New Horizons Probe will flyby Pluto tomorrow capturing the most detailed images of the dwarf planet we have seen. The journey from Earth has taken over 9 years travelling at a speed of around 9000 mph, which puts the scale of the Solar System map into perspective. 



#10 EZrhythm

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 12:23 PM

 We're but a pimple on the ass of the universe. 

Nope... go smaller.

 

 

My Right Scroll key is pissed... says not to visit that site again.



#11 2220020

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 03:10 PM

If you're leaving from our weary world and headed for the heart of Cygnus, why would you need to wheel through any other galaxies? It's in our own.

Who says the pilot of the Rocinante was from our galaxy? ;)
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#12 Slim

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 03:31 PM

I used to like working out the distances to scale as a kid, and I've just done it again.

 

Imagine the Earth has a 12 mm diameter, about the size of a marble. On this scale the Moon is about 38cm (15 inches) away, a small sphere about 3mm in diameter.

 

The Sun would be a bright ball of light about 1.39 metres (about 4.5 ft) in diameter, about 150 metres (164 yards) away.

 

The nearest star not counting the Sun (Alpha Centauri) would be roughly 9460km away, a distance of about 5878 miles.

 

So if you had a model of the Solar System in a park in Kansas, with the Sun 150 metres from your little half-inch Earth, you could place Alpha Centauri somewhere across the pacific in Japan (a sphere about 5.5 feet in diameter).


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#13 2220020

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 03:33 PM

I used to like working out the distances to scale as a kid, and I've just done it again.
 
Imagine the Earth has a 12 mm diameter, about the size of a marble. On this scale the Moon is about 38cm (15 inches) away, a small sphere about 3mm in diameter.
 
The Sun would be a bright ball of light about 1.39 metres (about 4.5 ft) in diameter, about 150 metres (164 yards) away.
 
The nearest star not counting the Sun (Alpha Centauri) would be roughly 9460km away, a distance of about 5878 miles.
 
So if you had a model of the Solar System in a park in Kansas, with the Sun 150 metres from your little half-inch Earth, you could place Alpha Centauri somewhere across the pacific in Japan (a sphere about 5.5 feet in diameter).

I did the same sort of thing with my daughter to help her understand that "space is really really big". She dug it.
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#14 Bones

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 05:29 PM

As big as the whole world and bigger.    

 

I'd love to go up in space.    Maybe UFO's with start taking volunteers.


♪♪♪♪♪♪♪


#15 SJS

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 05:32 PM

NASA's New Horizons Probe will flyby Pluto tomorrow capturing the most detailed images of the dwarf planet we have seen. The journey from Earth has taken over 9 years travelling at a speed of around 9000 mph, which puts the scale of the Solar System map into perspective. 

 

Also, I don't know what kind of steering rockets they may have onboard, but usually the orbital corrections you can make on probes like that are slight.  So think of the emptiness on that journey... but you still fire off a rocket 10 years ago and hit the fucking target after all that time and distance.  Pretty amazing.


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#16 SJS

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 05:35 PM

There are icons at the top by the way to "speed" up the scrolling.

 

What I found cool especially was looking at the relative distances of the various moons to their planets.  For example, if you were on Mars, you would be able to see both the earth and the moon, and you'd be able to see space in between them.  But of course from earth you have no chance of detecting the Martian moons due to their size and closeness to their planet.

 

I have had the pleasure of seeing the 4 large Jovian moons through a home telescope before and it's always impressive to see how they line up perfectly to each other and are appreciably far apart.  They look like little stars, but you can see all 4 in the same "frame" of the telescope as Jupiter (which in my scope is still just a slightly larger starlike object).


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#17 2220020

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 05:35 PM

Also, I don't know what kind of steering rockets they may have onboard, but usually the orbital corrections you can make on probes like that are slight.  So think of the emptiness on that journey... but you still fire off a rocket 10 years ago and hit the fucking target after all that time and distance.  Pretty amazing.

I've heard that even landing a probe on Mars is akin to standing at one end of Texas and hitting a hole-in-one at the other.
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#18 A Rebel and a Runner

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 06:26 PM

Which is doable, if you're aided by supercomputers and have the tools to correct your shot's trajectory.


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#19 Three Eyes

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 08:18 PM

I've seen various attempts to measure the scale of the astronomical before, and this one's pretty good.

 

http://joshworth.com...olarsystem.html

 

That was interesting. Oh and thanks for the carpal tunnel.


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Hey there goes Alex. He's loaded with money. Wow he's really set himself up great.


#20 The Macallan

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 09:29 PM

Also, I don't know what kind of steering rockets they may have onboard, but usually the orbital corrections you can make on probes like that are slight.  So think of the emptiness on that journey... but you still fire off a rocket 10 years ago and hit the fucking target after all that time and distance.  Pretty amazing.

 

At this late stage, if they wanted to make a course correction, it would take 4 1/2 hours for the signal to reach the craft ... at the speed of light. The human brain can't fully process this stuff. 

 

At least my linear brain can't. 


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