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Misophonia


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#1 Wandering Hermit

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 01:11 AM

I suffer from this. Only recently did I learn it is a real condition, shared by many.

 

From HuffPo:

 

Loud chewing by a friend, coworker or that random stranger next to you in line at the post office can drive even the most level-headed person up a wall. But for some people, the noise becomes entirely unbearable, spurring an extreme fight-or-flight response.

The condition is called misophonia -- literally "hatred of sound" -- and occurs when a common noise, whether it's something like a person chewing loudly, water dripping or someone "ahem"-ing, causes you to become anxious or angry, more so than a typical response, TODAY reported. It can also be known as Selective Sound Sensitivity Syndrome (4S) or hyperacusis.

"Everything I have turns into a boiling pot of rage, and then I have to talk myself down," Adah Siganoff, who suffers from misophonia, told TODAY. Siganoff has to sit in a separate room from her husband during dinner time because the sound of chewing gets to her so much.

Most people develop misophonia in late childhood, around the age of 10, and it can get worse as the person gets older, with more sounds becoming triggers, The New York Times reported. Not much research has been done on the condition, and some doctors still have never heard of it.

People with the disorder are not bothered by the loudness of sound -- rather, the softer, repetitive, common sounds are the ones that drive them up the wall, according to The New York Times.

"What they experience is kind of a Mount St. Helens eruption of emotions and feelings associated with these sounds," Dr. Marsha Johnson, of the Oregon Tinnitus & Hyperacusis Treatment Clinic, told TODAY.

There is no cure for misophonia, and people who have the condition learn to just avoid trigger sounds, Dr. Aage R. Moller, a neuroscientist at the University of Texas at Dallas, told The New York Times. Moller said the root problem likely isn't a hearing disorder, but more an issue of how these people's brains are activated by sound.

 

To manage, people with the condition can employ coping skills such as wearing ear plugs or playing white noise to drown out the trigger sound, according to Mispohonia UK. Therapy, including cognitive behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy, is also an option.

The condition is different from the fear of sound, which is phonophobia, and pain from certain frequency of sounds, which is hyperacusis, CTV News reported. It's also separate from tinnitus, which is ringing in the ears.

There is an online support group for people with misophonia, found here. The condition can often affect relationships.

 

Not all the trigger listed on various sites about misophonia bother me. Cats/dogs licking heir paws are not a problem. But eating with the mouth open, clipping nails, and humming all force me to leave the room.

 

Try listening to this video:

 

 

Apparently some people LIKE this (!?) It makes me want to scream.

 

 

 


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#2 Pressure/Hopenosis

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 01:19 AM

Oh my,  I can't stand the person who grazes like a cow!  Really?  You eat like that?


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#3 Wandering Hermit

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 01:22 AM

This is terrifying:

 


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#4 chemistry1973

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 01:56 AM

Slurping of cereal or soup.  I lose it.


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#5 Feverish Flux

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 03:10 AM

Jeezus H, do we really have to come up with an official psychological condition for every trivial annoyance?  Is there an official psychological condition for being annoyed by that?  

 

Fucking hell, we all fume over some mundane thing or other that people do.  Get over it and stop feeling like you've found an excuse just because someone came up with a name for it.  As though naming it somehow explains it (nominal fallacy). 

 

Hey everyone, I have.... umm...  taphonomia.  It's a recently discovered condition that totally makes me hate rotting stuff.

 

Hey, I think I also have.... errr.. repellent garrulousia.  So don't blame me if I have to leave the room when you ramble on and on like that.

 

 

 

 

 


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#6 SJS

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 04:32 AM

Jeezus H, do we really have to come up with an official psychological condition for every trivial annoyance?  Is there an official psychological condition for being annoyed by that?  
 
Fucking hell, we all fume over some mundane thing or other that people do.  Get over it and stop feeling like you've found an excuse just because someone came up with a name for it.  As though naming it somehow explains it (nominal fallacy). 
 
Hey everyone, I have.... umm...  taphonomia.  It's a recently discovered condition that totally makes me hate rotting stuff.
 
Hey, I think I also have.... errr.. repellent garrulousia.  So don't blame me if I have to leave the room when you ramble on and on like that.


Wouldn't taphonomia be the fear of naming a cemetery?

LYqbjSn.jpg


#7 MrSkeptic

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 04:35 AM

WTF? Afraid of holes? Afraid of or hate sounds? Buncha goddamn pussies.

 

Sack up and deal or maybe go to therapy.


They said I could be anything, so I became a disappointment.

 

 


#8 fast eddie

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 04:41 AM

Those holes can be scary things, donchaknow...nudge,nudge,wink,wink...

...oh, and therapy is for goddam pussies...
< He's flippin' off The Man, see...

#9 Moving Target

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 06:01 AM

Jeezus H, do we really have to come up with an official psychological condition for every trivial annoyance?

 

Yep, so the American Psychiatric Association members / Big Pharma can maximise profits.


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#10 Slim

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 08:46 AM

A couple of years ago when I worked for a firm with an office in Coventry I did notice something odd. My desk was quite close to a sort of communal tea/coffee point, a desk with a kettle, cups, a box of teabags and so on. For some reason when one particular colleague made a cup of tea behind me, I found myself revolted by the sound of the water from the kettle gurgling into her cup.

 

Not an instance of Misophonia I'm sure, but perhaps an example of how association can provoke odd reactions.


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#11 Planet X-1

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 11:17 AM

There`s a freaking nut at the gym who whistles very loudly while exercising/breathing...my iPod doesn`t have a high enough volume to drown him out...


in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....whistle....in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....whistle....in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....whistle....in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....whistle....in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....whistle....in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....whistle....in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....whistle....in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....whistle....in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....whistle....in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....whistle....in out...whistle...in out.....whistle....in out....

 

 

 

that`s it, I`m outta here.... :blink:


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#12 Wandering Hermit

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 11:46 AM

Wow, sure hit a nerve on Fluxy. The lady doth protest too much.

 

I'd love to be able to tune out the various disgusting noises that certain others are wont to make. Cannot do it. I get up and leave.


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#13 Wandering Hermit

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 11:57 AM

Also of interest is that there seems to be some evidence that this can be associated with having tinnitus, which I always associated with my simply having listened to too much loud music. The sound of absolute silence is not pleasant, because it is a high pitched ring that never ends.

 

 A list of triggers I found in another article:

 

Gum chewing
Eating sounds
Lip smacking
Speaking sounds (s, p, k)
Breathing sounds
Chewing noises
Repetitive softer sounds like pen clicking, pencil tapping
Nasal noises, throat clearing
Sucking through the teeth sounds
Sniffing
Sight of gum chewing or eating with the mouth open
Pet licking or nails clicking
High heels on hard floors (huh? I love that sound!!)
Dogs barking


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#14 GhostWriter

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 11:59 AM

So don't blame me if I have to leave the room when you ramble on and on like that.

 

I think that's it right there. It's a mechanism by which we can pass the blame for something onto something else. If we call it a disorder, or a disease, or an affliction, it is no longer us, but the thing that is to blame for our reactions. I'm sure we can name a whole host of these. How did people before the age of psychology ever cope!!


It is true, that a little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.

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#15 Wandering Hermit

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 12:22 PM

And major depression is just petulant moping, I suppose? Simply tell them all to cheer up!

 

I don't see that naming and describing an unconscious, unchosen behavior is a vehicle by which to "pass blame."

 

Fluxy of all people should be aware of the enormous degree to which our behaviors can be shaped by forces beyond our conscious control.


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#16 Feverish Flux

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 12:32 PM

I think that's it right there. It's a mechanism by which we can pass the blame for something onto something else. If we call it a disorder, or a disease, or an affliction, it is no longer us, but the thing that is to blame for our reactions. I'm sure we can name a whole host of these. How did people before the age of psychology ever cope!!

 

Exactly right.  And MT hit on the other fact (billion dollar business).

 

Hermie, you did strike a nerve.  For years I have despised much of clinical psychology and the pop psychology mindset.  My intention was not to attack you per se, but your topic is a quintessential example of the garbage people are fed on a daily basis.  

 

Please tell me how your life is better now that someone made up a name for the vexing experiences you describe.  The relief you feel upon learning the name is an illusion.


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#17 Feverish Flux

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 12:46 PM

And major depression is just petulant moping, I suppose? Simply tell them all to cheer up!

 

Of course not.  Not the same thing.  Unless your "misophonia" keeps you in bed all day, threatens your ability to hold down a job or maintain a family, and nothing your friends or family do seems to help.


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#18 Wandering Hermit

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 12:50 PM

Please tell me how your life is better now that someone made up a name for the vexing experiences you describe.  The relief you feel upon learning the name is an illusion.

 

I never said my life was better because it was named.

 

Simply naming it is not the point. By naming and describing it, it is possible to create a link amongst people that all experience a similar reaction. Whatever it may be. Then, through sharing experiences, it is possible to learn some ways to cope with it, if nothing else. This is bad?

 

If I found relief from learning a name, it indeed would be an illusion. The only thing remotely like relief is the hope that because this isn't something that only goes on inside my own skull, there is a higher likelihood of learning from others in the same boat how to deal with it.

 

I'm sure you would not rail against the existence of something like a cancer support group. While this certainly not as severe by orders of magnitude, having a community plays a similar role.

 

How about claustrophobia? Awareness of this condition goes back centuries. There are actual support groups for it. People do learn to mitigate it. Are you similarly dismissive of it, it's name, the fact that people suffer from it, and the fact that people that suffer from it find some consolation from the mere fact of being able to interact with others that share the same conditions? And if not, why is this any different?


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#19 Valium

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 01:40 PM

Vapour trails is a trigger or is it just crap album


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#20 MrSkeptic

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 01:44 PM

Yep, so the American Psychiatric Association members / Big Pharma can maximise profits.

 

And then get sued when stuff they sell turns out to be a lot worse than the made up condition the meds supposedly helped. e.g. Axiron and "Low T".


They said I could be anything, so I became a disappointment.

 

 





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