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#41 lemonlight

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 10:54 AM

It's back to the world of Music for today's entry, with the sad news of the passing of Tommy Ramone, the last remaining member of the original Ramones.

 

Anyone who saw them live knows how good they were.

 

Our thanks go to the Guardian for the following, and in keeping with the Ramones phylosophy, it's short and sweet.

 

Tommy Ramone, the last remaining original member of the New York punk band Ramones, has died of cancer at the age of 62 at his home in the city.

The manager-turned-drummer, and then producer of the band, was a Hungarian immigrant, born Erdélyi Tamás in Budapest, who came to the US in 1957.

Heavily influenced by 60s girl groups and the New York Dolls, Ramones formed in 1974, and were the first band from the underground punk scene in New York to make an album. Ramones, legend has it, was recorded in six days and cost $6,400 to make. It saw the first outing of their signature "1-2-3-4" introduction yelled out at the start of each song.

 

Their first album sold poorly in the US – although it was finally certified gold last month, 38 years after its release – but became underground gold for the UK's nascent punk scene. Their gigs in London at the Roundhouse and Dingwalls in July 1976 were credited by Joe Strummer of the Clash, John Lydon of the Sex Pistols and Captain Sensible of the Damned as pivotal – proving that their fledgling bands, too, might get out of the garage and on to a bigger stage.

 

 

Unpretentious and leather-clad, with holes in the knees of their skintight jeans, the band played their guitars badly and their drums maniacally, bridging the gap between rock and punk. Their extraordinary gigs featured barely a breath between songs, and they toured relentlessly until disbanding in 1996. They had gone through five record labels. Of the other founders, Joey Ramone died of lymphoma in 2001; Dee Dee was killed by a heroin overdose in 2002; and Johnny died from prostate cancer in 2004.

 

Tommy Ramone played on the band's first three album

s, co-producing two of them, before leaving in 1978, ostensibly because he was exhausted by the constant touring but later admitting that he had quit in reaction to being "physically threatened by Johnny, treated with contempt by Dee Dee, and all but ignored by Joey".

He was replaced by Marky, who was fired for alcoholism in 1983, to be replaced by Richie – both men are still alive.

 

Tommy kept his links with the Ramones, co-producing further albums, before starting an acoustic band called Uncle Monk with his partner Claudia Tienan, playing bluegrass music. It left him "baffled", he said, that the original Ramones all fell out in later years. "We were like brothers," he said.

The presidential-seal-style band emblem, designed by the late Arturo Vega, became one of the most recognisable band T-shirts ever and, for much of the band's career, a key source of income. It is perhaps even more well-known today than their songs, which include Sheena is a Punk Rocker, Blitzkrieg Bop, Pinhead and Rockaway Beach.

 

As tributes yesterday poured in for the "last Ramone", music journalist Tony Parsons tweeted: "RIP Tommy Ramone. No need for too many tears – that was one wild ride and making it to 62 is pretty good going for a Ramone."



#42 lemonlight

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 01:43 PM

We turn to the world of Sport for today's sad offering. A Historical figure in American track and field has passed away.....

 

Taken from today's edition of the  "Independent" newspaper.

 

Alice Coachman Davis was the first black woman to win an Olympic gold medal. She won the high jump at the 1948 Games in London with a national and Olympic record of 1.68 metres – the only American woman to win gold. She was honoured with a 175-mile motorcade in her native Georgia when she returned, but the black and white audiences were segregated at her official ceremony in Albany.

 

 

In 2004 Davis speculated that she could have won even more Olympic medals had the Second World War not intervened; she retired at 25 after her London victory. "I know I would have won in 1944, at least," she said. "I was starting to peak then."

 

Davis attended Tuskegee University and also played basketball for a team that won three successive titles. She won 25 national athletics championships, including 10 consecutive high jump titles, between 1939 and 1948. Growing up in the deep South during the era of segregation, she had to overcome multiple challenges. She was banned from using public sports facilities, so she used whatever equipment she could cobble together to practise.

 

"My dad did not want me to travel to Tuskegee and then up north to the Nationals," she said. "He felt it was too dangerous. Life was very different for African-Americans at that time. But I came back and showed him my medal and talked about all the things I saw. He and my mom were very proud of me."

 

Davis won her first national high jump title at 16 and worked as a schoolteacher and coach after retiring. She was inducted to the USA Track and Field Hall of fame in 1975 and the US Olympic Hall of Fame in 2004.

Alice Coachman Davis, athlete, coach and teacher: born 9 November 1923; died 14 July 2014.

 


#43 Phalanx

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 06:42 PM

RIP Johnny Winter.  A truly talented blues and rock guitarist.

 

Enjoyed his work with Muddy Waters and Rick Derringer.

 

http://www.latimes.c...0717-story.html

 

Rock n Roll, Hoochie Koo, baby!!!

 

His new album comes out September 2nd.


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#44 lemonlight

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 07:34 PM


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#45 pjbear05

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 10:27 PM

RIP Johnny Winter.  A truly talented blues and rock guitarist.

 

Enjoyed his work with Muddy Waters and Rick Derringer.

 

http://www.latimes.c...0717-story.html

 

Rock n Roll, Hoochie Koo, baby!!!

 

His new album comes out September 2nd.

70 years old and still playing gigs, was due to play the Seminole Hard Rock right up the road in Hollywood.  The computer is blasting out The Progressive Blues Experiment in his memory.  Rock on, John Dawson Winter III, you'll be sorely missed. :(


"Can't help about the shape I'm in, I can't sing, I ain't pretty, and my legs are thin.

But don't ask me what I think of you, I might not give the answer that you want me to."

 

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy."

 

 

 


#46 baldiepete

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 01:18 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk...t-arts-28390309

RIP James Garner

Jim Rockford won't be getting back to us anymore :(

#47 MrSkeptic

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 04:01 PM

I tried to support my local sheriff too. R.I.P.


They said I could be anything, so I became a disappointment.

 

 


#48 MrSkeptic

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 04:06 PM

R.I.P. Archie Andrews. He died taking a bullet meant for his gay friend. I guess even once lighthearted comics aren't immune from politics.


They said I could be anything, so I became a disappointment.

 

 


#49 Soddy

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 04:14 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk...t-arts-28390309

RIP James Garner

Jim Rockford won't be getting back to us anymore :(

 

 


Please buy my books so I can send my girl to a decent school.

 

http://www.kathrynlively.com


#50 nickslikk2112

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 09:52 PM

Like most people in Englandland I used to love the Rockford Files. A bloke near me even used to drive a gold Pontiac Firebird, I think it's now a pile of rust under a tarpaulin.

 

RIP James.


645df0a0-f61a-4f15-a847-b0bdbfe31afb_zps

 

Old Rush Good, New Rush Bad!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


#51 DarthLen

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 12:37 AM

Rockfish! 

 

Watching Garner & Lemmon play grumpy old presidents was fun; 2 talents gone to be sure...



#52 lemonlight

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:30 AM

Today, we enter the world of "Arty-farty" conceptual "Art" and mourn the passing of one of it's heros.

 

Thanks to the Heraldscotland newspaper.

 

Otto Piene
 
Tuesday 22 July 2014
 
 
 
Artist

Born: April 18, 1928 Died: July 17, 2014

 

OTTO Piene, who has died aged 86, was a conceptual artist known for his gigantic open-air sculptures. He was most famous for his Olympic Rainbow, which consisted of coloured tubes that lit up the sky at the end of the 1972 Munich Olympic Games. His work has been exhibited in more than 100 galleries and museums worldwide.

 

He was born in Bad Laasphe in Germany, the son of a physicist, and studied art at the Hochschule für Bildenden Künste in Munich and the Staatliche Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf. He also studied philosophy at Cologne University.

 

His first medium was paint but he became interested in light early on in his career and in the late 1950s founded the influential Zero Group of artists with colleague Heinz Mack. The word zero was thought to refer to 1945 as Year Zero and was designed to redefine art after the Second World War. Piene once said that "zero was about the pure possibilities for a new beginning". "Artists after the war turned against technology, because war is technology," he said.

 

From 1959, the year in which he had his first one-man show in Düsseldorf, he worked on The Light Ballets in which light from moving torches was projected through moving grids, and also became known for a series of smoke pictures in which Piene burned paper and then created pictures using the soot. He also developed what was known as the Grid Picture, a type of stencilled painting made from half-tone screens.

 

In 1972, he created his most famous work for the Olympic Games of that year by filling different-coloured tubes with helium and using them to create a strip of rainbow that lit up the sky. Following the Palestinian terrorist attack on the athletes' village, Piene's work was seen as a symbol of hope.

 

Piene, who called the work Sky Art, said "people really got the feeling that there was a reason to hope, that not everything from now on would be disaster, death and destruction".

 

He followed the Olympic project with other large-scale works, including Lighter Than the Air in Paris, which was made of tubes arching across each other, and the sculpture Superstar in Berlin. All of them used Piene's favourite medium of light.

 

"To praise light alone does not seem enough for me," he said. "I take hold of the darkness itself and shine light through it. I make it transparent." In 1974, he was appointed director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Centre for Advanced Visual Studies, retiring in 1993. He died shortly after the opening of an exhibition of his work at Berlin's Neue Nationalgalerie and is survived by his wife and four children.

 


#53 Slut Puppy

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 10:10 PM

I think this is only appropriate considering the thread.  One of my twisted guilty pleasures...
 
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EChbyJ6QeSs


Stole my thunder... ;)

...I'm the whole source of everything.


#54 lemonlight

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 08:07 AM

Today we mourn American Hero and member of the "US Astronauts Hall of Fame" (Yes, apparently such an orginisation exists) Henry "Hank" Hartsfield. Henry 'Hank' Hartsfield was an astronaut who dealt with bad plumbing and fires in the space shuttles Columbia, Challenger and Discoveryhartsfield_2985790b.jpgThe astronaut Henry Hartsfield Photo: NASA6:15PM BST 24 Jul 2014comments.gif2 Comments

Henry 'Hank' Hartsfield, the American astronaut, who has died aged 80, piloted the final test flight of the space shuttle Columbia, flew the space shuttle Challenger on the voyage before its disastrous final outing, and commanded Discovery on its maiden voyage; he considered himself lucky to have survived.His hairiest moments came during the Discovery expedition in 1984. The spacecraft had been scheduled for lift-off on June 26, and Hartsfield and his five-man crew were strapped into their seats as the countdown began at Cape Canaveral. Four seconds before lift-off, however, computers detected a problem in one of the main engines and the flight was aborted. Ten minutes later a fire was detected on the launch pad.hartsfield_discove_2985799c.jpgDiscovery blasting off from the Kennedy Space Center on August 30 1984 (GETTY)As the crew sat nervously in their cabin above some 500,000 gallons of volatile propellants, listening to reports of the fire around the engines more than 120ft below, Hartsfield considered giving the order to bail out, but decided against it. Related Articles

This was fortunate, as it turned out: because the fire was caused by burning hydrogen, it was invisible to the human eye — and had the astronauts used the normal emergency escape procedure across the service arm to “slidewire” escape baskets, they would almost certainly have run into the flames.Discovery eventually took off at the end of August, but the voyage was not plain sailing. Not long into the mission a metre-long icicle formed over the nozzle that jettisoned waste water into the vacuum. Left intact, it could potentially have damaged the ship’s tail upon re-entry, necessitating costly repairs.After an attempt to melt the ice by rotating the shuttle in the direction of the Sun, the crew decided to try to dislodge it by using the robotic arm of the space shuttle. Reasoning that any damage sustained to the shuttle was ultimately the responsibility of the commander, Hartsfield took the controls, taking care not to damage the solar tiles on the shuttle’s wing.The lump broke free, but left the plumbing system out of action for the remainder of the voyage; and the crew were forced to resort to plastic bags, using old socks to soak up the urine and prevent zero-gravity leaks. “In retrospect that was a fun problem,” Hartsfield recalled, “but it wasn’t so much fun at the time.”Discovery eventually landed at the Edwards Air Force base on September 5, having successfully completed a six-day mission. As it was 1984, the year cinema audiences were gripped by Ghostbusters , Hartsfield’s actions with the robotic arm earned the crew the sobriquet “Icebusters”.The son of a bookkeeper, Henry Warren Hartfield was born in Birmingham, Alabama, on November 21 1933 and took a degree at Auburn University, Alabama, where, when Chemistry proved to be something of a disaster — “I was always blowing up things and catching things afire,” he recalled — he switched to Physics. Following graduate work at Duke University and at the Air Force Institute of Technology at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, Hartfield entered the US Air Force in 1955, serving as a pilot with the 53rd Tactical Fighter Squadron in Germany.After joining Nasa in 1969, he earned an advanced degree in Engineering Science from the University of Tennessee. Although he had joined as an astronaut, he had to wait 13 years before making his maiden flight. In the meantime he served in Nasa’s astronaut support crew and was part of the team behind Apollo 16 in 1972, the fifth mission to land men on the moon.In 1982 he made his space debut as part of the two-man crew of the Columbia on its fourth and last test flight, a seven-day voyage in which Columbia orbited the earth 112 times and carried out a number of experiments, including studying the effects of weightlessness on plants such as algae and duckweed and animals such as the fruit fly and brine shrimp.hartsfield_columbi_2985819c.jpgHenry Hartsfield (right) walking towards the Columbia space shuttle with Ken Mattingly in 1982 (AP)The voyage was credited with rekindling American interest in space, and Columbia would go on to make more than two dozen operational missions before its disastrous final voyage in 2003, when it broke up during re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere, killing all seven crew members on board.Hartfield’s third and final shuttle flight was as commander of an eight-person crew aboard the shuttle Challenger, which was carrying a German Spacelab, in October 1985. On its next flight, less than three months later, Challenger exploded shortly after take-off, killing all seven crew members on board.By this time Hartfield had circled the Earth 321 times, spending a total of 20 days, two hours and 50 minutes in space.Hartfield continued to work for Nasa on the ground and was part of the team that planned the International Space Station. After retiring from the agency, he was an executive at the Raytheon Corporation.Hartfield was described by his fellow Discovery crew member Richard “Mike” Mullane as “a man so far right on the political spectrum he made even the John Birch Society [a far-Right campaign group] look like a collection of hand-wringing, pantywaist liberals”.His more politically moderate colleagues enjoyed teasing him about his views, a female crew member once giving him as a birthday present a copy of Ms magazine with a personal dedication written by the feminist Gloria Steinem.Hank Hartfield was inducted into the US Astronauts Hall of Fame in 2006.He married, in 1957, Judy Massey, who survives him with a daughter. Another daughter predeceased him last year



#55 lemonlight

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 12:15 PM

The world of music again today. This time we mourn the loss of early Marquee  Club Manager John Gee.....

 

This from the Independent.....

 

Many of the rock musicians who came out of the British Isles in the mid-1960s to conquer the world first achieved notoriety at the Marquee Club, which was then located at 90 Wardour Street in Soho. With its striped canopy, transferred from its original premises in Oxford Street, where the jazz-loving accountant Harold Pendleton had established the club in 1958, the Marquee helped launch the careers of groups like the Moody Blues, The Who and Free as well as performers such as Al Stewart, Elton John and David Bowie.

 

 

Club secretary-turned-manager, John Gee was a pivotal part of the team who made the Marquee “the most important venue in the history of pop music,” according to Melody Maker. Like Pendleton, Gee was a jazz buff, but was able to tap into the blues boom and progressive rock genres that dominated the late 1960s.

In particular, he championed groups like Ten Years After, writing the liner notes for their eponymous 1967 debut – “bloody marvellous” – and Jethro Tull, who named the jazz-flavoured instrumental B-side of their second single, “A Song For Jeffrey”, “One For John Gee”.

 

Born in East London, he was an only child who spent his early teenage years in Berkhamsted, near the RAF base where his father was stationed. He did his National Service in the RAF and retained an officer-like demeanour apparent in his approach to introducing the acts at the Marquee. He worked for the dance bands led by Ambrose and Ted Heath, tour-managing and handling their publicity, and began writing for various publications including Jazz News – which was owned by Harold Pendleton, who brought him to the Marquee. He booked acts and wrote the club’s newsletter as well as the programmes for the National Jazz and Blues Festival, the forerunner of the Reading Festival.

 

“John Gee loved Frank Sinatra, especially the Sinatra At The Sands album he recorded with the Count Basie Orchestra,” recalled Chris Wright, co-founder of Chrysalis Records. In 1967 he was managing Ten Years After: “He was blown away by their version of ‘Woodchopper’s Ball’, a Woody Herman number. The group went down a storm at the Marquee and soon after John was on the phone offering us a weekly residency, quite an accolade at the time.”

 

A rather strict and staid figure with a dry sense of humour, Gee insisted that bands should be in their dressing room 15 minutes before they were due on stage, not an easy task since the Marquee didn’t have an alcohol licence until 1970, and musicians tended to linger at La Chasse, the nearby drinking club run by Jack Barrie, who replaced him as manager that year. He took on a new role in the London offices of Radio Luxembourg, staying until the station stopped its English-language transmission in 1992. He spent the last two decades in quiet retirement. 

PIERRE PERRONE



#56 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 05:26 PM

Interesting bit about the songs dedicated to him.......Need to find a Jethro Tull Rarities album.... :)


EnjoyCCola.jpgmusicgif.gif

ninjaanim1.gif

 

panda.gif

Chris Hardwick is NERDIST GOD. Portrait-%20Chris%20Hardwick%20sm.jpg

 

oldman.gif

 

HugeGrin.gif

 

Here's the KITTY! kittyredX.gif

 

sfl_glbtsm.gif

"OH!"

:banana dance Original: "PEANUT BUTTAH JELLEH!" :banana dance Original:

 

"I'm DAMAGED...and I LIKE IT!"

 

"We are here to HELP each other, not to HARM each other.  Think about it..."


#57 lemonlight

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 09:23 AM

Good point. I imagine you could compile a whole album of songs that were probably inspired by him.



#58 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 04:16 PM

No Doubt! :)


EnjoyCCola.jpgmusicgif.gif

ninjaanim1.gif

 

panda.gif

Chris Hardwick is NERDIST GOD. Portrait-%20Chris%20Hardwick%20sm.jpg

 

oldman.gif

 

HugeGrin.gif

 

Here's the KITTY! kittyredX.gif

 

sfl_glbtsm.gif

"OH!"

:banana dance Original: "PEANUT BUTTAH JELLEH!" :banana dance Original:

 

"I'm DAMAGED...and I LIKE IT!"

 

"We are here to HELP each other, not to HARM each other.  Think about it..."


#59 lemonlight

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 02:31 PM

As commemerations begin to remember the "Great War" I thought it apt to post a few short obituaries of those times From the Telegraphhttp://www.telegraph...-World-War.html

#60 Soddy

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 10:05 PM

James Brady died today. I still remember the images on TV of him lying face down in his blood. More than once they reported him as dead then.

 

http://www.nytimes.c...at-73.html?_r=0


Please buy my books so I can send my girl to a decent school.

 

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