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#21 DarthLen

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 03:56 PM

yea, pulled into this topic thinking it was going to be about one of the local (to me) godfathers of speed/black/death metal, Obituary... Glad I wasn't the only one who saw it that way... lol



#22 Greg

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 06:01 PM

Worst of news everyone. Geddy is dead. :(


Not again!

#23 lemonlight

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 06:18 PM

Has Neil not finished that Obituary yet ?



#24 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 02:11 PM

Geddy Lee...The "Lazarus" of Prog.....


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#25 MrSkeptic

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 03:41 PM

Geddy Lee...The "Lazarus" of Prog.....

 

No. This is the Lazarus of prog.

 


They said I could be anything, so I became a disappointment.

 

 


#26 lemonlight

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 09:10 PM

Personally, I can't wait for Steven Wilson to die. What an obituary that will be.



#27 nickslikk2112

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 09:49 PM

Steven Wilson, a man most of you out there will never have heard of has died. He had thousands of musical projects that you have never heard of. Produced many acts you will never have heard of. Then tried to get recognition riding on the coat tails of some bands you may possibly have heard of by remixing their best known works.


645df0a0-f61a-4f15-a847-b0bdbfe31afb_zps

 

Old Rush Good, New Rush Bad!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


#28 nickslikk2112

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 09:52 PM

Former Worcestershire Batsman Damian D'Oliveira has died of cancer aged 53.

He was famous for being the son of Basil D'Oliveira.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...cester-28078433


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#29 Pressure/Hopenosis

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 12:47 AM

Steven Wilson, a man most of you out there will never have heard of has died. He had thousands of musical projects that you have never heard of. Produced many acts you will never have heard of. Then tried to get recognition riding on the coat tails of some bands you may possibly have heard of by remixing their best known works.

Well then...  He is voted out of the thread...  I need a 2nd then we can move on to more meaningful deaths...


They say the pen is mightier than the sword.  I say fuck the pen because you can die by the sword! - Tom Araya


#30 lemonlight

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 07:54 AM

You've got it.



#31 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 02:22 PM

Personally, I can't wait for Steven Wilson to die. What an obituary that will be.

 

My Dear Olde Fish.  Go and BOIL YOUR HEAD.


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Chris Hardwick is NERDIST GOD. Portrait-%20Chris%20Hardwick%20sm.jpg

 

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Here's the KITTY! kittyredX.gif

 

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"OH!"

:banana dance Original: "PEANUT BUTTAH JELLEH!" :banana dance Original:

 

"I'm DAMAGED...and I LIKE IT!"

 

"We are here to HELP each other, not to HARM each other.  Think about it..."


#32 lemonlight

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 07:20 PM

For those who's interest has been piqued, the film "Dogtown and Z-Boys" is available to view on YOUTUBE



#33 lemonlight

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 07:22 PM

See Skateboarder obituary.



#34 lemonlight

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 07:25 PM

My Dear Olde Fish.  Go and BOIL YOUR HEAD.

 

I see you don't understand satire.



#35 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 07:57 PM

I see you don't understand satire.

 

Make a video and put it on YouTube....sometimes satire has to be SEEN (body language and such) to be recognized... :)


EnjoyCCola.jpgmusicgif.gif

ninjaanim1.gif

 

panda.gif

Chris Hardwick is NERDIST GOD. Portrait-%20Chris%20Hardwick%20sm.jpg

 

oldman.gif

 

HugeGrin.gif

 

Here's the KITTY! kittyredX.gif

 

sfl_glbtsm.gif

"OH!"

:banana dance Original: "PEANUT BUTTAH JELLEH!" :banana dance Original:

 

"I'm DAMAGED...and I LIKE IT!"

 

"We are here to HELP each other, not to HARM each other.  Think about it..."


#36 lemonlight

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 08:04 PM

I'm working in the medium of Morbid,Respectful Humour.



#37 lemonlight

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 07:58 AM

I am indebted to the "wishy-Washy" Guardian newspaper for today's obituary.

A Character from Hatian politics, who broke the mould by not displaying any mass murdering traits.

I give you Leslie Manigat.....



Leslie Manigat, who has died aged 83, was Haiti's first modern-minded president. He tried to break the vicious circle of class-based violence and dictatorship that had held Haiti prisoner for nearly two centuries, but instead was broken by it himself. A social scientist and historian, the energetic and fiercely ambitious Manigat governed for only 133 days before he was overthrown in June 1988 by a drunken general who had earlier allowed him to win a fraudulent election.

Born into a middle-class family from northern Haiti, Manigat studied in Paris and his first job was in the foreign ministry under the dictator François "Papa Doc" Duvalier, whose "noiriste" and nationalist views he shared. But he fell out with the tyrant, who accused him of organising a student strike and briefly threw him in jail. He left the country in 1963 to teach at universities in the US, France, Trinidad and Venezuela, and campaign tirelessly against the dictatorship. Duvalier sentenced him to death in his absence.

The generals who took over when the Duvalier family fled in 1986 were forced to hold what were to be the country's first free elections, but they staged an election-day massacre and annulled the vote, in which Manigat was a candidate. Though he had fought the dictatorship for a quarter of a century, he was desperate for power, and cut a deal with the army and their Duvalierist allies, who saw him as a respectable frontman to redeem them after the massacre. They proclaimed him president after a rigged election in January 1988 in which turnout was around 5%.

His excuse was that the army was "an inescapable fact of life" and had to be negotiated with. He was right, but his opportunism in the wake of the killings provoked universal revulsion, making his rule impossible. He never managed to gain the upper hand over Duvalierist death-squads and the army's violence and demands. The US had also suspended all aid after the killings.

Yet he was not interested in stealing public money and genuinely wanted to promote democracy. This meant challenging his military patrons. He made a tactical alliance with a powerful druglord colonel and then, on 19 June, dared to sack the army chief, General Henri Namphy, and other key officers.
But rebellious soldiers came for the over-confident Manigat as he celebrated his supposed victory at a champagne party and bundled the portly president on to a plane into exile. He left calling himself "the last and only hope for democracy". Namphy announced his takeover in a drunken post-midnight TV appearance.
Manigat's chief legacy was his unprecedented division of the army, which led to the country's first democratic elections two years later. He was also the first of a trio of presidents (Manigat the admired intellectual, a judge, Ertha Pascal-Trouillot, and a Catholic priest, Jean-Bertrand Aristide) who gave some Haitians confidence that they could have respectable leaders instead of the thugs who had gone before them.

He wanted to engage with the country's poor. But he and his wife, Mirlande, a former student of his, had spent decades abroad and were judged arrogant and out of touch with the informal ways of Haitian society, where, for instance, an ill-paid soldier or bodyguard would expect and receive small personal favours from the president.
Anger at Manigat for his 1988 election betrayal faded with the years and after the couple returned to Haiti, he scored 12% at the 2006 presidential election and she 32% at the last one in 2011.
His wife and five of his seven daughters survive him.
• Leslie Manigat, politician, born 16 August 1930; died 27 June 2014



#38 lemonlight

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Posted 03 July 2014 - 11:33 AM

Today we mourn the loss of a pivotal figure in the world of comics.

 

Bill Stirton, former head of the artists’ department at DC Thomson, has died at the age of 94.

 

In a 37-year career with the company he was studio manager in the days before computers and was involved in producing artwork for many publications.

He also tutored young artists and took great pride in seeing them develop their skills and abilities.

 

Mr Stirton saw active service during the Second World War and was in the retreat at St Valery where he escaped the advancing Germans by plunging into the English Channel and scrambling up a net to board a rescue ship.

 

Born in Birkhill and educated at Muirhead and Logie Central schools, he joined the Territorial Army in 1938 and on the outbreak of hostilities the next year he was called up into the 237 Highland Field Company, Royal Engineers.

 

His unit went right through Italy clearing mines and building bridges and had to be near the front. He later confessed to not being able to explain his luck to survive the terrifying experience.

 

He joined DC Thomson after the war and in 1956 went to join the art department of the Daily Express in London. Homesick, he returned to Dundee and the company within a year.

 

The period was one of expansion, with Bunty launched in 1958 and Judy in 1960, followed by a succession of new titles on the Meadowside slipway including Victor, Diana, Hornet, Jackie and Mandy.

 

Mr Stirton became studio manager in 1974 and led the department when the tools of the trade were a drawing board, set square, ruler, pens, Radiograph, Letraset and pencils.

 

He recently said: “There was a lot of pressure because every publication needed work done by the department. But it all went smoothly and we still had time for a laugh and a bit of fun.”

 

Mr Stirton, who retired in 1985, lived at Rosemount in Blairgowrie where he golfed. He was also a member of the Dundee Press Club.

He was active long into his retirement and was a regular contributor to The Courier’s Craigie column, posting his final letter only last week.



#39 lemonlight

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 01:54 PM

Today, we pay homage to Hollywood psychic Kenny Kingston.

 

Hats off to the Telegraph for this hilarious obituary.

 

KENNY KINGSTON, who has passed over to the other side aged 87, was a self-proclaimed “Legendary Psychic to the Stars” and seemed to have a whole graveyardful of dead celebrities at his beck and call, ranging from Marilyn Monroe to the Duchess of Windsor.

 

The Tinseltown psychic, whose apricot-coloured hair and preternaturally smooth skin led one British journalist to describe him as “a pixie with a facelift”, was well versed in automatic writing, auras, past lives, soul mates and who is going to win on Oscar night. He translated these skills into a lucrative business involving television shows, psychic hotlines and private “readings” at $250 an hour.

 

On this side of the Styx he advised the likes of Lucille Ball, Greta Garbo and John Wayne; on the other side he took messages from Elvis, James Dean and Bette Davis. He knew Marilyn Monroe from both sides. He had been her “one and only psychic” on Earth and, after her death in 1962, maintained contact, assuring her fans that she was studying philosophy so she could live a healthier life when she was reborn — an event predicted for 2005. “She wants to come back and not appear to be a dumb blonde,” he explained. “It’s quite common. I know for a fact there’s a teenager in Boston who is Errol Flynn.” But Marilyn had no regrets about her premature passing: “She couldn’t have coped with being 65. She was one of these people who had to be glamorous. How many face lifts can you have?”

 

During a spectral visit in early August 1977, Marilyn told him that within two weeks Elvis Presley would be joining her: “And sure enough, on August 16, Presley passed.” It was not long before ‘The King’ too was paying regular ghostly visits to Kingston, most spectacularly in 1990 at a Beverly Hills seance at which he “appeared” dressed in a coral toga and singing Amazing Grace. The purpose of the visit was to tell the world that it was not the drugs and alcohol that had taken him away, but his desire to be reunited with his mother. “He’s studying medicine, a new form of medicine which is going to revolutionise the world,” Kingston breathlessly revealed.

 

By the psychic’s account, he first met the Duchess of Windsor after a party when he overheard her talking to someone on the phone about “a bill for clothes that she did not want to pay”. “I gave her a reading. I gave her a reading many times, in different cities.” The Duchess had given him a gold photograph frame, which in later years he would produce at the drop of a hat as testimony of their relationship.

 

Her main preoccupation, he said, had been that “she wanted the royal title”. Naturally, therefore, after the death in 1997 of Diana, Princess of Wales, it was the Duchess who was on hand to welcome Diana to the other side, soon “introducing” her to Kingston. “The Duchess of Windsor originally greeted Diana... because she felt a kinship to her, as both had been stripped of their royal titles,” Kingston recalled. “The Duchess looked immaculate in a white gown and she soon brought in Diana, looking radiant in a royal blue gown.”

 

In death the Princess, who had a “pale green aura”, proved to be even more profligate with her indiscretions than she had been in real life. Among other things, Kingston revealed, she had concluded that her death had been the result of a “well-planned accident”. In 2007 he used a crystal dish (supposedly one of the last items she touched before she left the Ritz Hotel in Paris on the night of her fatal accident) to summon her spirit to a seance. The Princess informed him that she wanted Gwyneth Paltrow to portray her in a film and also wanted her younger son, Harry, to succeed to the throne. “She shockingly said that, as much as she truly loves both of her boys, she feels that in the long run Harry would be more suited to become the next monarch, rather than William,” he reported. “She feels Harry is more military minded. She thinks William is a bit more of a playboy and less serious about the monarchy.”

 

n fact Kingston seemed to have rather a low opinion of William. Asked for his prognosis after the Prince’s marriage to Kate Middleton, he thought it “obvious” that the relationship would not last: “First of all, why would you give a new woman that you love your mother’s ring?”

 

But the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge could take heart from Kingston’s record when it came to the annual seance at which his dead celebrity friends would pick the winners in the run-up to Oscar night. Given the limited shortlists involved his record was decidedly patchy. In 2003, for example, Marilyn Monroe predicted Julianne Moore would be best actress (the award went to Nicole Kidman); Richard Harris put in a bid for Daniel Day-Lewis to win best actor (the winner was Adrian Brody); and Bette Davis complained about Catherine Zeta-Jones’s commercial appearances and tipped Kathy Bates for best supporting actress (Zeta-Jones won). Cary Grant predicted a tie in the best supporting actor category between Ed Harris and Chris Cooper (who won the award alone). If Charlie Chaplin was correct in tipping Roman Polanski for best director and Elvis in tipping Chicago for best picture, they were only following the bookies.

 

“I’m not always right,” Kingston admitted but, he observed: “That proves I’m no charlatan.”

 

Kenny Kingston was born on February 15 1927 in Buffalo, New York State, and claimed to have learned his craft from his grandmother, his mother and his mother’s friend, Mae West. After school, Kingston served in the US Army in the mid-1940s, putting on entertainments for troops serving in Italy. He also told fortunes as a sideline, claiming, after the war, to have been consulted by presidents Truman and Eisenhower about their re-election chances.

 

After leaving the Army he moved to San Francisco, where he became the host of a (non-psychic) television talk show, through which he met the Hollywood glitterati, for some of whom he began to do readings.

 

In the 1960s, after a move to Los Angeles, his celebrity connections helped him as he turned his hobby into a money-spinner. His wheezes included a “Psychic Passport” prepaid phone card that would take users to one of a network of psychic counsellors.

Not everyone was impressed: “I was having a conversation with this lady, and you could tell she was reading from a script,” one customer complained. “You could tell she was at home, because she kept putting her hand over the phone and yelling at her kids to shut up.”

 

Kingston was often called upon to give his prognosis on celebrity relationships, though he proved no more accurate with these than with the Oscars. It was perhaps not too tough a call to suggest, in 2006, that Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes’s marriage was doomed (they divorced in 2012), but other predictions were wide of the mark.

 

In 1990 Elvis arrived to tell him that “Donald and Ivana Trump are really in love. They are soul mates” (their divorce was finalised in 1992). In 2008 Kingston claimed that Reese Witherspoon and Jake Gyllenhaal were always destined to be together because they had been lovers in a previous life, serving as a doctor and nurse on the battlefields of the First World War. They broke up the following year.

 

Kenny Kingston is survived by his partner, Valerie Porter.



#40 lemonlight

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 11:20 AM

GREETINGS MOURNERS.

 

There were some star studded candidates for today's slot with Edward Shevernadze a shoe-in until

 

Alfredo decided to pop off this mortal coil :( .So in this a world cup week let's remember one of the true greats of "the beautiful game"

 

 

Born: 26 May, 1926, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Died: 7 July, 2014, in Madrid, Spain, aged 88

 

 

ALFREDO Di Stefano, one of the greatest footballers of all time, has died in Madrid following a heart attack. He was 88.

The Argentinian “Blond Arrow” was the first “Galactico” of football’s television age, the player around whom other superstars – Hungary’s Ferenc Puskas, Spain’s Francisco Gento, France’s Raymond Kopa and Brazil’s Didi – orbited as Real Madrid won the first five European Cup competitions in succession. In Madrid, you fitted in and were subservient to Di Stefano, or you shipped out.

 

Di Stefano was born in Buenos Aires of international lineage; his paternal grandfather was Italian, his maternal grandparents French and Irish. He was in the River Plate first team at the age of 17 and winning the Copa America with Argentina at 21.

 

In 1949 the Argentinian players went on strike and Di Stefano decamped to the Millonaros club in Bogota, where, because the Colombian FA was outwith Fifa, players were being paid extravagant wages.

 

Eventually, Colombia joined Fifa and Di Stefano returned to River Plate. His talent was spotted by the big Spanish clubs and an unseemly spat developed when both Real Madrid and Barcelona claimed to have signed him. Fifa told the Spanish football federation to find a solution and a four-season deal was cobbled together which would have seen Di Stefano play one season for Barcelona, the next for Real Madrid.

 

However, with the Barcelona board split on whether or not to accept this, Real president Santiago Bernabeu d’Yeste took positive action and signed the player in 1954 and Di Stefano ended up a Madridista for the next decade.

 

His timing was immaculate. Real entered the inaugural European Cup in 1955-56, beating Rheims of France, who had themselves knocked out Hibs in the semi-final, in the first final in Paris. Di Stefano scored, as he would in each of the first five finals, capping that amazing run with a hat-trick as he and four-goal Puskas monopolised the scoring in Real’s 7-3 win over Eintracht Frankfurt at Hampden Park in 1960.

 

As the 128,000 mainly Scots who were there in person will tell you, along with the millions more who watched the grainy black and white television pictures, this was the greatest football match ever played.

 

Di Stefano had won six caps for Argentina, then four for Columbia, by the time he was granted Spanish citizenship in 1957, and he was immediately catapulted into the Spanish national team.

 

Spain were drawn in a World Cup qualifying group with Scotland and Di Stefano made his first appearance at Hampden in late 1957. His habit of dropping off the front line to play “in the hole” had perplexed the defenders of the time, but at Hampden, Scotland captain George Young had a plan: he played almost as a sweeper, with Tommy Docherty man-marking Di Stefano.

 

It was a job ‘The Doc’ relished; he left his mark on the great man, and Di Stefano barely got a kick at the ball as Scotland won 4-2 on their way to qualifying for the 1958 World Cup finals.

 

Di Stefano had missed out on the 1950 and 1954 World Cups because Argentina didn’t enter. He had one final chance in 1962, when his goals played a part in getting Spain to Chile. However, he play in the finals, after sustaining a thigh injury and, alongside Jim Baxter, George Best and Ryan Giggs, he remains one of the greatest players never to have featured on football’s biggest stage.

 

The following year he captained the Fifa XI, memorably described by Baxter as “a case of too many chiefs and not enough Indians”, which lost to England at Wembley in the FA’s Centenary International. Then, in 1964, he quit Real for a last hurrah with Espanyol, before, in 1967 hanging up his boots after a farewell game, in the Bernabeu, against newly crowned European champions Celtic, whose Jimmy Johnstone stole the show with a display of magic.

 

Di Stefano, then aged 40, turned to coaching. He returned to Argentina, where he coached both halves of the country’s “Old Firm”, River Plate and Boca Juniors. He then took Seville to success in the Spanish Cup and the European Cup-Winners’ Cup, before returning to the Bernabeu as coach.

 

He certainly had successes there, as he did with all 12 of the clubs he managed in Argentina, Spain and Portugal, but his managerial spell at Real is perhaps best remembered for the 1982-83 season when Real finished second in five competitions – the Spanish League, Cup, League Cup and Super Cup, and the European Cup-Winners’ Cup, when they were beaten in extra time in Gothenburg by an unheralded team called Aberdeen, managed by a young Alex Ferguson.

 

Di Stefano was presented with a bottle of whisky by Ferguson before the game. It was a psychological ploy dreamed up by legendary Celtic manager Jock Stein, who Ferguson worked under with the Scottish national team, designed to give the impression that Aberdeen were a small team honoured to be in the presence of greatness.

In later life, although beset by poor health (his final, fatal heart attack was his third), Di Stefano became one of football’s greatest ambassadors. In 2000 he was appointed honorary life president of Real Madrid, who later named their second stadium, where they train and their reserve teams play, after him.

 

When, to mark its golden jubilee, Uefa invited each of its member associations to name their Golden Player – their top one over those 50 years - Di Stefano was Spain’s choice; Kenny Dalglish was Scotland’s. Di Stefano was named in fourth place, behind Pele, Maradona and Johan Cruyff in Fifa’s list of the 100 greatest players of all time, while, in Argentina, he, Lionel Messi and Maradona are considered the Holy Trinity of football.

 

His records make impressive reading: 485 club goals in 554 games – that’s 0.74 goals per game. His international record is even better: 29 goals in 37 games (six for Argentina, 31 for Spain), making 0.78 goals per game. An average of 0.5 goals per game is the benchmark for a top-flight international striker.

As a player he won 13 domestic league titles, eight domestic cups, five European Cups and one Intercontinental Cup. As a manager, he led his clubs to five league titles, five domestic cups and a European Cup-Winners’ Cup.

 

He twice, in 1957 and 1959, won Uefa’s Ballon d’Or as Player of the Year, then won a Super Ballon d’Or in 1989. He was four times voted Spain’s player of the year.

Yes, he scored goals, lots of them, but he was just as effective playing in a slightly withdrawn role, creating space and opportunities for others. Many observers have rated him the greatest all-round player ever.






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