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The National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force


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#21 Planet X-1

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 01:40 PM

Great stuff SJS !!! :)


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#22 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 04:24 PM

SJS-That B-17 being painted with the Tavern's name is a B-17 G model from later in the war, and a lot of the German fighters also incorporated 20mm cannons in their armament, generating devastating damage also.....I have a B-17 G model that is partially completed and still packed away somewhere here, of an amazing color/repair scheme.  I need to dig that up and finish it.....I like colorful stuff!

 

65802386-4718-41a3-9c88-cea41700d1de.jpg   :wub: :)

*Picture and text borrowed from "AIRCRAFT OF WORLD WAR II, 600 Full-Color Drawings  by Bill Gunston", This edition was published by Crescent Books in 1980.  Library of Congress # 80-65755  ISBN 0-517-31680-3


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#23 sbach66

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 05:45 PM

Very cool stuff.  My grandfather was a copilot in B26's, 9th Air Force.  391st Bomb Group, 572nd Squadron.  Was wounded in the leg in February 1945, and was out for the duration.  I've got his plane numbers and markings, one of these days, going to get around to building an accurate model. 

    



#24 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 07:24 PM

Very cool stuff.  My grandfather was a copilot in B26's, 9th Air Force.  391st Bomb Group, 572nd Squadron.  Was wounded in the leg in February 1945, and was out for the duration.  I've got his plane numbers and markings, one of these days, going to get around to building an accurate model. 

    

 

Which B-26 version?  It was originally made by Martin Corp. but after that was retired, the Douglas (Formally named A-26 Invader) took the moniker B-26...


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#25 sbach66

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 07:49 PM

Which B-26 version?  It was originally made by Martin Corp. but after that was retired, the Douglas (Formally named A-26 Invader) took the moniker B-26...

The original Marauder.



#26 sbach66

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 07:52 PM

The original Marauder.

Here's a picture, he's second from the left.

 

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#27 SJS

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 09:47 PM

Wasn't the protocol of our bombers to fly at lower altitudes, as well?  Essentially for the same reason they flew during the day: for increased accuracy. And with the same result regarding danger: being easier to hit.
Really, being a member of a bomber crew is exceptionally dangerous, and seems absolutely harrowing.


You may be right about the altitude. At one of the exhibits, they emphasized that the missions were often 8 to 10 hours, and that the planes were not pressurized. It was below zero temperature, and they wore oxygen masks most of the flight. The waist guns were positioned through holes in the fuselage. When the bomb doors opened, the air in the plane rapidly exchanged.

They also emphasized that once a bomb run started, that was it, it was finishing. Obviously, the anti aircraft attacks got fiercer and more accurate during the bombing run, but the crew expected that and expected to stay the course. Heroic stuff, and from a bunch of random 20 year olds.

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#28 SJS

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 09:51 PM

Love the comments everyone.

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#29 Moving Target

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 11:10 PM

Wasn't the protocol of our bombers to fly at lower altitudes, as well?  Essentially for the same reason they flew during the day: for increased accuracy. And with the same result regarding danger: being easier to hit.

Really, being a member of a bomber crew is exceptionally dangerous, and seems absolutely harrowing.

 

Air Marshal Harris and General Spaatz had different philosophies.  The RAF reckoned that it was impossible to precision-bomb, so they went at night and dropped everything on the centre of a given city.  They still lost 60,000 crew, amounting to two-thirds their strength, including my Uncle Jim, Flying Officer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, whose Handley Page Halifax crashed on take-off.

 

Handley_Page_Halifax.jpg



#30 SJS

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 11:38 PM

Air Marshal Harris and General Spaatz had different philosophies.  The RAF reckoned that it was impossible to precision-bomb, so they went at night and dropped everything on the centre of a given city.  They still lost 60,000 crew, amounting to two-thirds their strength, including my Uncle Jim, Flying Officer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, whose Handley Page Halifax crashed on take-off.
 
Handley_Page_Halifax.jpg


Yes, the RAF suffered many losses in their raids of German cities. The philosophy was that if you couldn't precision bomb military targets, you could bomb the hell out of the cities at night, keeping the factory workers from getting a decent night's sleep. As Churchill said of the RAF, never have so many owed so much to so few.

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#31 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 06:00 PM

The Boeing B-29 was one of the first aircraft to be pressurizable....

 

SBach- I have a model of that aircraft as well.... also the Douglas model....


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#32 Moving Target

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 06:10 PM

 As Churchill said of the RAF, never have so many owed so much to so few.

 

He said that of Fighter Command in 1940.

 

While the Fighter boys kept Britain in the war, Bomber Command probably shortened it, even though German industrial production went up every year until 1945. 

 

I suppose that Harris justified the murder of perhaps half a million German civilians with the argument that every bomb his fliers landed on target saved the life of an Allied serviceman, and that he helped bring forward the day when the extermination camps were shut down for ever.



#33 DustoftheStars

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 02:05 AM

A little of the kind of plane my grandfather flew on:  The B-17 Flying Fortress.  He was a radio operator and ball-turret gunner.

 

dude...so was my dad! i have to look up what company he was in,...

 

ok, looked back at the papers- HQ 93rd bomb group (H) AAF station 104. With Addison Baker. When europe was done, they went to either ND or SD to get set to go to the pacific theater, but then those bombs were dropped and they didn't have to go. I have his discharge papers with Truman's sig.


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Know, my child, that there is no devil seekin' to cause guilt in the hearts to men.
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Fear not the movement of the heavens above or the earth below for change is what we are, my child.
And if we are reflections of the divine we must roll with these changes, for we are these changes.  

 

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#34 Moving Target

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 04:28 PM

My Dad says the biggest regret of his life was failing his final exam in RAF aircrew school in Saskatchewan.

 

Had he passed, he would have been made up to Sergeant, joined a bomber crew and gone on ops like his big brother, my Uncle Jim.  As was, he sat out the war in Canada, returned to England to guard ex-USAAF bases, before demob in 1946.  He tells a story about lone guard duty on Christmas Eve 1945, marching up and down with his Lee-Enfield .303" to keep warm.

 

I told him that, had he passed the exam, he would have had a 2/3 chance of getting shot down by 88mm flak or a Luftwaffe night fighter.



#35 PumpkinHead

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 04:50 PM

SJS,

 

Thanks for sharing.....

 

Great stuff!!!



#36 Slim

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 12:53 PM

He said that of Fighter Command in 1940.

 

While the Fighter boys kept Britain in the war, Bomber Command probably shortened it, even though German industrial production went up every year until 1945. 

 

I suppose that Harris justified the murder of perhaps half a million German civilians with the argument that every bomb his fliers landed on target saved the life of an Allied serviceman, and that he helped bring forward the day when the extermination camps were shut down for ever.

 

He wrote "I do not personally regard the whole of the remaining cities of Germany as worth the bones of one British Grenadier". I'm afraid I do think that the attack on Dresden especially was a war crime, and a dreadful one at that.



#37 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 05:37 PM

My Father was not let into Fighter school because he had flat feet.  He didn't fancy Bomber school, and so joined the Army itself and was literally made a 'go-fer' and listed as 'Clerical'...he eventually got his pilot's license, after the war, and he and his older Brother owned a Cessna 172 together.  He did some cool stuff in the war though.  He was a part of  The Alsos Mission, which was the Operation designed to find out how far the Germans were with creating an Atom bomb.  He told me about the 'fun' of shepherding captured German Scientists around to different interrogations and such....He's the one who got me interested in model building, helping me make a Ford Tri-motor, and a B-24 D liberator in 1/72 scale, I made the Hawker Hurricane Mk. I myself....There is a pic of a 're-make' of this elsewhere....SJS, THANKS for this Topic!!!


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"OH!"

:banana dance Original: "PEANUT BUTTAH JELLEH!" :banana dance Original:

 

"I'm DAMAGED...and I LIKE IT!"

 

"We are here to HELP each other, not to HARM each other.  Think about it..."


#38 SJS

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 10:09 PM

Bumping this thread in honor of Memorial Day in the U.S.  Spawned some great discussion from the peeps.


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#39 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 04:36 PM

Air Marshal Harris and General Spaatz had different philosophies.  The RAF reckoned that it was impossible to precision-bomb, so they went at night and dropped everything on the centre of a given city.  They still lost 60,000 crew, amounting to two-thirds their strength, including my Uncle Jim, Flying Officer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, whose Handley Page Halifax crashed on take-off.

 

Handley_Page_Halifax.jpg

 

This appears to be a Handley-Page Halifax British Bomber, MP.  Is that accurate?


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"OH!"

:banana dance Original: "PEANUT BUTTAH JELLEH!" :banana dance Original:

 

"I'm DAMAGED...and I LIKE IT!"

 

"We are here to HELP each other, not to HARM each other.  Think about it..."


#40 OldRUSHfan

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 06:05 PM

My interest is because not many nations produced four engined bombers in WW II, and I'm trying to find models of all the candidates for my collection.  I only have one British  type so far, the Avro Lancaster, although I know of a few others in 1/48 scale...most are only reproduced in 1/72 scale, and not very detailed.  I LOVE DETAILS!!!  Yes, I've really EARNED my title of MR. OCD in this case!  this is a Douglas Devastator TBD-1 Torpedo Bomber from just before the U.S. entered the war...this particular plane (minus nose art) served on the Aircraft Carrier Hornet, and the designation 8-T-1. Eighth squadron, Torpedo, and unit number or aircraft number.

Douglas%20Devastator%20TBD-1%207.jpg

Douglas%20Devastator%20TBD-1%205.jpg


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Here's the KITTY! kittyredX.gif

 

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"OH!"

:banana dance Original: "PEANUT BUTTAH JELLEH!" :banana dance Original:

 

"I'm DAMAGED...and I LIKE IT!"

 

"We are here to HELP each other, not to HARM each other.  Think about it..."





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